Constant cravings? Here’s 18 evidence-backed (or anecdotal) tips that will curb them.

Are you back into the swing of things but your taste buds aren’t?  It happens! Especially around this time of year where intake of sugar, alcohol and processed carbohydrates tends to be higher for most people, and while going cold turkey can be the best move, it’s sometimes easier said than done. The good news is that by reducing these foods, you’ll begin to lose the taste for them, and they’ll no longer hold the appeal that they had. For some though, completely removing them is a better idea – even small amounts can continue to drive the appetite for them. Regardless of which camp you fall into, here are some proven, some anecdotal, and some interesting ways to combat those cravings.

  1. The basics: build your plate based around protein and fibre, with fat for satiety. Protein is well known to be the most satisfying nutrient, and along with fibre (also key for adding bulk and feeling full) will keep most people satisfied longer than either carbohydrate or fat. Any starchy or carbohydrate-based foods are best if they are minimally processed (such as potatoes, kumara, legumes, fruit) as these will provide more nutrient bang for your buck). How much of each? Protein-type foods (meat, fish, eggs, poultry) aim for 1-2 palm-sized portions. Starchy carbs (if included) at around a fist-sized amount.  Fat? 1-2 thumb-sized amounts, depending on the type of protein portion you’re eating: a fattier cut might be satisfying enough, however a lean chicken breast will likely require some added fat to help satisfy you. And vegetables? Go for gold – other than the starchier varieties (mentioned above) you could fill your boots with these. For some people, having a full plate is essential to feeling satisfied and if you can do that by adding more volume, it is going to have a positive effect on the satiety from a meal (that’s definitely me). For some ideas, check out my recipe e-book or my online coaching service.
  2. Get rid of anything that is ‘your poison’- if you are the person that hears the icecream calling you from the freezer, it is much better off out of the house. Out of sight, out of mind.
  3. Put all the ‘treat’ type food in one place in your house, preferably above eye level. This will save you seeing the Christmas cake when you are grabbing the eggs, and the chocolate almonds when you are searching for the bottle of olive oil. Constant reminders of all the things you are trying not to eat will NOT help your cause.
  4. Chew your food properly at each meal. Aim for 30 times per mouthful. That way you’ll digest your nutrients effectively, feel more nourished and less likely to be hungry an hour after eating because you wolfed that meal down.
  5. Do not substitute those refined sugars for ‘natural’ sugars. That dried fruit is pretty much just sugar – and (a few nutrients and fibre aside) no better than sugar and will continue to drive your sugar cravings. You shouldn’t rely on dried fruit (or any sweet food that is marketed as ‘refined sugar free’) as a substantial nutrient source . Any additional fibre or nutrients they provide in the diet is negligible compared to the whack of goodness you’ll get when you follow #1 above. When health bloggers or food producers market something based on the healthfulness of the ‘natural’ sugar, it is pure embellishment. 6 meedjol dates and a banana does not make a smoothie sugar free.
  6. Coconut oil – this is a favourite of Sarah Wilson’s: a teaspoon of extra virgin coconut oil can kill a craving in its tracks. If we head to the literature to find any peer reviewed papers on the topic (for what it’s worth, there is a LOT of research published by the Coconut Research Center), there isn’t a lot to definitively tell us that it will cut cravings. That said, there is some research has found that people who include more coconut oil in their diet (compared to other types of fat) have reduced food intake overall, particularly in the subsequent meals. Like most things, you have nothing to lose by trying it.
  7. Cocoa – chocolate is long associated with cravings, though right now, consumption of chocolate may well increase the cravings rather than stamp them out. It’s also not exactly useful if you’re trying to focus on reducing your intake of junk food! That said, chocolate is known for its cognitive and mood enhancing benefits. So how about some unsweetened cocoa (or cacao) in hot water with some milk to deliver the chocolate taste you are after. Add a touch of stevia if you wish. You could also do this cold with almond milk and ice – and add 1 tablespoon of psyllium husk or gelatin in there for some additional fibre or protein. If chocolate is what you’re after – go for the darkest that you can stand. Many people find they stop at 1-2 pieces of 90% chocolate instead of the 1-2 rows consumed of the 70%.
  8. Anything that lowers your blood sugar response to a meal is going to positively impact your cravings. The steep rise and fall of your blood sugar in response to a meal causes alarm bells to start going off in your brain. The body runs a tight ship and prefers when all systems are in homeostasis. Low blood sugar causes a release in stress hormones which tell your liver to dump glucose into the bloodstream, and create cravings so you can re-establish blood sugar to within a normal range. Including cinnamon can reduces glucose response after a meal (in amounts of 6g) and affects insulin response. Stabilising blood sugar is going to help reduce cravings. Sprinkle this gold dust on your breakfast, with your teaspoon of coconut oil, in your cocoa drink etc.
  9. Glutamine – can enhance secretion of GLP-1, a hormone which promotes insulin release that helps increase satiety and dampen appetite – this is only seen in some people however, suggesting there is individual variation of its effects. The flipside of this is that the insulin-releasing effects may override any satiety benefits, increasing hunger (and subsequent meal size) at the next meal. However, in practice this is a tool that many clinicians (myself included) have found useful for some (but not all) clients. The presence of glutamine in the bloodstream is associated with improved insulin sensitivity in healthy people. In addition to this, glutamine has been found to be beneficial for improving intestinal permeability and tight junction protein expression in the gut, being one of the most abundant amino acids in the body. If your cravings are related to gut dysbiosis then it could be useful from this perspective. In addition, it functions as part of neurotransmitter production. Taking L Glutamine by putting it under the tongue as a craving hits (1-3,000mg) may just work for you.
  10. Magnesium is a nutrient that is involved in over 250 processes in our body, and particularly when we are under stress, it is put under the pump. Sugar (or specifically) chocolate craving is often linked to a deficiency to magnesium, but that isn’t conclusive. At any rate, magnesium is perfectly safe to take, and as our food supply is relatively low in magnesium, looking for a supplement that is a magnesium glycinate, citrate or chelated with amino acids may be useful, at amounts of around 300-400mg elemental magnesium.
  11. Chromium is another supplement that some people have found useful for stopping cravings – research has found a reduction in carbohydrate cravings, food intake and an increase in satiety when supplementing with chromium…however this is in the laboratory using mice. There’s nothing definitive in the research to support using it for people who already have adequate amounts of this mineral. That said (as with anything), it’s individual – I know many clients who swear by using Chromium supplements when a craving hits. The only way to know if it works for you is to try it, by taking 1000mg chromium in two doses in meals that contain carbohydrate (due to its suggested benefits at reducing blood sugar response to carbohydrate meals)..
  12. Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are three amino acids that act as nutrient signallers which may help reduce food intake . Leucine (one of the BCAAs) activates mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) which is required for our brain to respond to leptin (a hormone that tells our body when we have had enough food). BCAAs are involved with hormone release in both the gastrointestinal tract and in fat deposits. BCAAs and dietary protein enhanced glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release and reduced the expression of genes required for synthesis and adsorption of fatty acids in a human intestinal cell line (NCI-H716), suggesting an intestinal mechanism for the beneficial effect of BCAAs. Those that have successfully used BCAAs suggest 5g in the AM and every few hours while you’re adjusting your diet back to baseline awesomeness.
  13. 5htp: 300-500mg taken with a meal to increase satiety of the meal – studies have found a reduced food intake (particularly carbohydrate). Studies conducted have focused on people who have reduced availability of tryptophan in the brain (a precursor to 5htp). Increasing 5htp increases tryptophan and therefore serotonin production, reducing cravings and overall food intake. (Don’t use if you are currently on antidepressants without clearance from your doctor.)
  14. Exercise. A no brainer, really, but research has found this to be super effective for reducing cravings. In fact, any activity done while in the midst of a craving will take your mind off it. So when a craving hits, doing something active for 10-15 minutes can reduce your desire for something sweet. Go for a powerwalk, shoot some hoops, do some hill sprints…
  15. Make sure you’re getting enough sleep! It’s hard this time of year with longer days and opportunities to take advantage of summer (when it shows up…) Sleep restriction enhances activity in brain regions involved in reward in response to energy dense, nutrient-void food (think: lollies, chips, chocolate), suggesting heightened sensitivity to rewarding properties of food. This can lead to increased cravings. If you are burning the candle at both ends and not yet back to your regular 7-8 hours sleep per night, then nailing this will go a long way to helping curb that sugar demon.
  16. Meditation: decentring – viewing your thoughts as separate from yourself – has been found to help reduce food cravings and want for unhealthy food items. Mindfulness practice is also useful for not only reduced cravings, but for reduced emotional eating, body image concerns. It doesn’t require a 90 minute class three times a week (though there’s nothing wrong with that!) Headspace, Calm or Buddhify are three smart phone applications which may help you get going and provide guided sessions of between 2-20 minutes long. It’s consistency and frequency that makes a difference (like any habit).
  17. Clay modelling to reduce cravings: yep. Researchers found that visual imagery plays a key role in reducing craving. Participants who worked for 10 minutes constructing shapes from plastacine had reduced cravings for chocolate compared to people who were left to their own thoughts or who were given a written task.
  18. Your gut bacteria can influence your cravings. There is indirect evidence for a connection between cravings and the type of bacteria lurking in your gut. For example, people who enjoy and crave chocolate have different microbial metabolites (i.e. bacteria by-products) in their urine than “chocolate indifferent” individuals, despite eating identical diets. In addition, gut bacteria can influence the production of our ‘feel good’ and motivation hormones (serotonin and dopamine), thereby influence food decision-making based on our mood. Finally treating mice with a probiotic reduced hunger-inducing hormones and food intake. Action points here? Yes, you could start with a probiotic, particularly when you’re in the thick of it all, as this will help ensure there are beneficial bacterial strains present in your gut. However, for ongoing gut health, the regular addition of probiotic and prebiotics through food will help you maintain a healthy gut microbiome. Therefore:
  • Include fermented vegetables into 1-2 meals daily, working up to 1-2 tablespoons at a time.
  • The addition of unsweetened yoghurt (dairy or coconut) as part of your everyday diet (as it contains beneficial bacteria).
  • Kombucha, at around 100-150ml per day (check the back of the label to ensure a lower sugar variety).
  • Water, milk or coconut kefir, start with around 100ml per day.
  • Raw apple cider vinegar in water – start with 1 tsp in a small amount of water, working up to 1 tablespoon. This will help stimulate stomach acid when taken prior to meals, helping you digest your food properly, and delaying gastric emptying, so your glucose response to the meal will be slower too.
  • Vegetables, in abundance, to include fibres that feed your gut bacteria.

(As a side note, any change to your gut environment can result in unintended (and unwanted) changes to your digestive tract! If you’re new to the fermented foods and/or probiotics, then start small and work your way up. If you end up spending way more time in the bathroom than you wanted, reduce back further. Consider yourself warned.)

You won’t need to do all of these – but I think #1-5, #14, #15, #16 and #18 would completely diminish that sugar demon so you can get back to feeling awesome.

cravings

Grab that cupcake and bin it immediately. Underneath something that will stop you from retrieving it later on. (PC: SamadiMD.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you need to snack? Here’s 31 ideas just in case (and because you’re awesome).

Sometimes you just want some new ideas. Or it’s a day where you just feel like mooching around and making a few things in the kitchen.

Snacking. As I said earlier this week on Facebook, I’m not a fan of snacking for most people as it often means they haven’t eaten properly in the previous meal, thus their need for a snack is due to roller coasting blood sugar levels which affects their stress hormones, energy and mood.

However, sometimes you just need to snack. And if you’ve eaten what you normally KNOW is a balanced meal with plenty of vegetables, a good hit of protein and some fat, but still feel hungry – then you should probably eat. And if you’re not sure what a balanced meal looks like, then check out Jamie’s blog discussing the Heart Foundation’s take on paleo – he outlines what his meals look like. Pretty simple. (And do read the whole post – it’s GREAT).

Ignoring your hunger cues is not good in the long term – yes, even if your goal right now is to lean up, if you’re eating well and exercising appropriately, then it’s likely your muscle mass is increasing and you need to feed it! Don’t use the scales as a guide to your progress – this is gravitational pull – nothing more. In the last 6 months I’ve gained 10 kg to help restore hormonal equilibrium to my over-stressed body – and while on paper it might look like a lot, visually it’s not what you would imagine it to be, as I’ve kept up weight training and gotten a lot stronger. Of course I’ve got more body fat, but I’m a lot healthier too because I’ve got more muscle; it’s had the opportunity to grow as it hasn’t been broken down to use as fuel (which can happen when you’re over-stressed). The scales tell you nothing about the composition of your body. To under fuel (even when trying to lean up) would put your body in a catabolic state, stripping muscle and potentially bone too if you go too low in calories (protein is the major component of bone, you know).

The more you listen to your body and NOT eat to a schedule, set calorie number or macro nutrient goal, the better you will be at at figuring out what your body needs. For most people, we lose this ability at a very early age, because we are told to ‘eat everything on our plates because there are starving children in Africa.’ I feel sorry for parents actually, as almost everyone I know blames their parents for a certain lack of intuition around their eating. It’s not their fault. They were told the same thing.  The good news is, though, is that it’s not irreversible. We just have to start being more aware of what we eat (processed food which is quickly digested, low in fat or protein and not satisfying), how we eat (fast, slow), where we eat (at the table? in front of the TV?) and how much attention we are actually paying to what we eat (device use, TV etc). Here’s some quick tips about mindful eating. You can retrain yourself to listen to your body. It just takes time and effort, but it will be worth it. I’ve just ordered this book too – I’ve heard great things about it and think it will be a really valuable resource.

So back to snacks. Muesli bars, low fat fruit yoghurt and snack packs of Snax crackers are going to leave you hungrier than before you ate them. They are developed to provide the sensory pleasure to your brain that makes you want to eat more (called a Bliss point). They are also high in processed carbohydrate or sugar (especially that fruit yoghurt, these new yoghurt pouches have 4 teaspoons of sugar, around 3 of them from added sugar) which are just best avoided.

Here’s 31 other ideas in case you need some more inspo.

  1. A couple of hardboiled eggs (boil a dozen at the start of the week and make your way through them. They’ll last a good 5 days unpeeled).
  2. A couple of cooked chicken drumsticks (meat that is closer to the bone is far tastier and there are far more nutrients than just pure muscle meat).
  3. Half an avocado, seasoned with salt and pepper.
  4. Around 40g cheese (not Edam. Unless you really enjoy it! Full fat dairy has many important health benefits which for some reason got overlooked with the updated food guidelines. Didn’t they read my blog?
  5. Meatballs – make these and freeze in single serve packs to have an easy go-to snack. Try my sesame miso meatballs.
  6. Almost 4 ingredient chocolate chai brownie. No sugar added at all (I promise).
  7. Raspberry coconut berry bites.
  8. Lemon coconut lunchbox treat. Again, no sugar was harmed in the making of this deliciousness.
  9. A scoop of protein powder with minimal added crap (such as Clean Lean Protein, Vital Health, Balance Natural Whey powder) + ½ cup of full fat Greek yogurt topped with berries. There are many better quality protein powders now available on the market. And while protein powders aren’t my go-to for every day eating, those people who are more active and require protein to support their lifestyle, OR for people who for some reason can’t or don’t eat animal source protein, they can be a good addition to the diet. However there are many CRAP products out there, with a lot of additional fillers, preservatives, additives for flavour, thickeners etc. Check the ingredient lists.
  10. Half an avocado with 1/2 can salmon mixed in, lemon juice, salt and pepper.
  11. Steam some greens (broccoli, brussel sprouts, beans) + drizzle with 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil or butter, add salt and pepper.
  12. Vegetable chips (bit of prep) but thin sliced beetroot, carrot, parsnip, tossed in bag with 2 Tbsp olive or coconut oil + spice of choice OR salt/pepper – baked in preheated oven of 170 deg (350 deg far) for 10-12 min.
  13. Tamari almonds from Alison’s Pantry. These are dry roasted, unlike many that you find that are roasted in vegetable oils.
  14. A handful of Pure Delish cereal (look for 10g/100g or less sugar per 100g) – I love this cereal but to be honest, as a breakfast I’m not going to recommend it as a go-to. I think the brand itself is great, and perfect for tramping/camping as an easy breakfast option. But if you want to ensure you’re not going to go hungry, start your day with a bit more protein. This would fill you up but it is easy to over eat in order to feel satisfied.
  15. The only plant that would survive a nuclear holocaust chips, like these Ceres Organics ones. Hello. Delicious, but wow – expensive! Obviously super easy to make these yourself (many delicious ways to do this).
  16. Kelp leaves flash fried in coconut oil with salt (a great source of iodine, a mineral important for our thyroid function which isn’t easily available in the food supply for people who don’t enjoy seafood). This kiwi (and local to me!) product is seriously tasty.
  17. Dried meat snacks (Biltong, bier sticks) – such as Canterbury I love Epic bars in the States but while some are made with quality NZ meat, they aren’t available here. It’s hard to come by a brand which is minimally processed, so definitely read the ingredients list. Jack Links (despite the great radio adverts which I think are awesome – is NOT a great product. When you try Canterbury V Jack Links, you can taste the difference too – alongside the addition of preservatives other than spices and salt, it is a sweeter product, with 20g of sugar per 100g product, compared to between 1-3g per 100g for Canterbury.
  18. Crackers free of grains, such as Little Bird or Flackers – or make your own. Super simple and a lot cheaper too. There are a lot of variations to these, here’s mine.
  19. Apple slices layered with a tablespoon of peanut butter + 1 tsp chia seeds mixed through
  20. Meedjol date sliced lengthways, with salted pistachio nuts stuffed inside. This is small and not at all lower carb. Delicious though.
  21. Large tomato, scoop out middle, crack an egg in, grate some parmesan cheese, bake in a 180 degree oven till egg is cooked.
  22. The Vegery snack wraps: hello delicious! These would be a great lunch on the go or for a snack. Try the apple and coffee one with some peanut butter and grated carrot. Delicious.
  23. ½ cup cottage cheese + ½ small sliced banana + a handful of walnut halves.
  24. Rice paper (which has been dunked in warm water to soften, then patted dry, wrapped around sliced avocado, a slice smoke salmon, cucumber, grated carrot, snow peas.
  25. Lightly toast a handful of sunflower seeds in a pan, then pop some into a pitted avocado half, salt + pepper. Delicious change of texture.
  26. Cheese + sliced red pepper sliced wrapped in ham that has been sliced thinly off the bone.
  27. ¼ cup hummus (ideally home-made, like Jamie’s one, he is awesome) + teaspoon of pesto in bottom of jar, carrot/cucumber sticks standing up in them. Try to choose a pesto that has an olive oil base, such as this Genose one – not one that is made on a canola oil base.
  28. Apple slices cooked in coconut oil and topped with haloumi, a’la Sarah Wilson style.
  29. A leftover sausage, split into half lengthways, with some cheese grated into it and mustard, heated in microwave.
  30. A slice of my tahini chia loaf with avocado. Yum.
  31. 2 squares of 90% Lindt with a teaspoon of almond or peanut butter. Decadent. You’re worth it.

And I’ve plenty of other ideas where these come from. If you would like more individualised help, check out my services page or sign up to my online nutrition coaching system – it’s free for 28 days for you to try!

snack

PC: www. revive.ca

14 reasons to ditch the toast and jam (and 7 key tips to help you do this).

After feeling like I’d taken a trip back to 2003 with some of the sports nutrition posts and articles I’d been reading lately, I got tagged in a cool picture from a listener of our Fitter Radio podcast  – a triathlete who has switched from the traditional higher carb, lower fat diet approach to eating lower carb, higher fat, real food whilst training and commented she ‘didn’t know her 41 year old body could be the best body I have ever had’ (Woot! high fives all around!!) This coincided with finishing Mark Sisson’s Primal Endurance book.

Mark outlines 115 reasons why athletes should train and eat the Primal Endurance way. I concurred with pretty much all of them. I have added my own 2c worth, added some literature below (and cut it down to 21 for brevity’s sake). While geared towards athletes, hands down this is applicable to everyone. Everyone.

So if you’re currently eating toast and jam pre OR post training (or in general), I’ve outlined the 14 reasons why you need to ditch that junk and become a fat burning beast, and 7 key tips to help you get there.

  1. Western diet is based on excess grains and sugars (and low fibre) which stimulates excess insulin production, leading to lifelong insidious weight gain, chronic inflammation and elevated disease risk factors.
  2. A high carb, grain-based diet can leave endurance athletes nutrient deficient (due to phytic acid effects on minerals), inflamed and more susceptible to the oxidative damage of the stress of training, general life and poor nutrition.
  3. The way that most people consume modern grains (cereals, breads, pasta) ends up being a cheap source of calories which are immediately turned into glucose upon ingestion and offer minimal nutritional value. There are no good reasons to consume these types of grains and many good reasons not to, especially for those who are sensitive to gluten and other anti-nutrients found in wheat.
  4. Everyone is sensitive to the health compromising effects of grains at some level, especially the pro-inflammatory effects of gluten and the propensity for the lectins in grains to cause leaky gut syndrome.
  5. Even lean people suffer from the consequences of carbohydrate dependency, such as chronic inflammation, oxidative damage, and accelerated ageing and disease risk factors.
  6. Carrying excess body fat despite careful attention to diet and a high training load is largely due to carbohydrate dependency caused by a grain-based diet and chronic training patterns.
  7. Carbohydrate dependency cycle looks like this: consume a high carbohydrate meal – elevate bloods sugar – stimulate an insulin response – shut off fat metabolism and promote fat storage – experience fatigue and sugar cravings – low blood sugar elicits stress response and we consume more carbohydrates – stimulate the fight or flight response to regulate blood sugar – dysregulate and exhaust assorted hormonal processes, and end up in burnout and weight gain (potentially lifelong)
  8. Weight loss through portion control, low fat foods and calorie burning is ineffective long term. And while we think calories burned through exercise stimulate a corresponding increase in appetite – research might not back this up. I tend to think that people are more likely to eat more because they ‘reward’ themselves OR the long slow training allows increased opportunity to eat sports ‘junk food’ and the amount of calories burnt through training is far less than you think – and overestimated more so in females in certain instances. At any rate, the secret to weight loss is hormone optimisation, primarily through moderating excess insulin production.
  9. Endurance athletes can begin to dial in to their optimal carbohydrate intake by asking themselves the question ‘do I carry excess body fat?’ Any excess body fat calls for a reduction in dietary carbohydrate intake to accelerate fat burning.
  10. Endurance athletes who already have an optimal body composition but are looking to optimise training and recovery should choose high nutrient value carbohydrates. These include a high volume of vegetables, a moderate fruit intake, kumara/potatoes and other starchy tubers, dairy for those that tolerate, wild rice, quinoa and small amounts of dark chocolate.
  11. Endurance athletes with high calorie needs who also have an optimal body composition can enjoy occasional treats, but the habit of unbridled intake of nutrient-deficient carbohydrates should be eliminated in the interest of health and performance.
  12. Primal style eating (or eating minimally processed foods) is fractal and intuitive, and when escaping carbohydrate dependency and becoming fat adapted, you don’t have to rely on ingested carbs for energy. Eating patterns can be driven by hunger, pleasure and maximal nutritional benefit.
  13. Escaping sugar dependency and becoming fat adapted gives you a cleaner burning engine, since glucose burning promotes inflammation and increased oxidative stress
  14. Ketones are an internally generated, energy rich by-product of fat metabolism in the liver when blood glucose and insulin levels are low due to carbohydrate restriction in the diet. Ketones are burned efficiently by the brain, heart and skeletal tissue in the same manner as glucose. You do not need to be on a ketogenic diet to upregulate your ability to produce ketones – you can do this via a lower carbohydrate approach.

HOW TO DO THIS: 7 KEY TIPS

  1. Step one: omit sugars, grains, industrial seed oils for 21 days. Step two: emphasis highly nutritious foods such as meat, poultry, vegetables, eggs, nuts, fish, fruits, some full fat dairy, seeds, and kumara/potato.
  2. 100g or less of carbohydrate promotes fat loss, 150g is around maintenance level and over this could promote lifelong weight gain and over 300g could promote disease patterns.
  3. While transitioning to primal there are some struggles initially due to lifelong carbohydrate dependency and the addictive (for some) properties of sugar and excess grains and wheat. Headaches, dehydration, lower blood pressure and ‘dead legs’ are all initial side effects when removing processed food. Trust me – this too will pass.
  4. To minimise side effects, start the transition in a base-training phase of your training where training occurs at an easy pace. The transition phase can take anywhere from 2-12 weeks initially.
  5. Consume salt. Don’t underestimate the importance of this! Lower circulating insulin affects your body’s ability to retain sodium (and other electrolytes) – so we need more, particularly as processed food (of which you are no longer basing your diet around) is where you got around 70% of your sodium from.
  6. You can accelerate the process of fat adaptation by instigating some of the tactics used by athletes who opt to ‘train low’ – i.e. in a low glycogen training state. Some of these are naturally undertaken if you train without eating in the morning, or work out after dinner in the evening and don’t consume anything post-workout. If you’re new to this, have a read through to establish which might suit you best, and start instigating 1-2 x per week. Don’t undertake all of them as this aggressive approach could cause too much additional stress, derailing your plans to become a fat-burning beast.
  7. The FASTER study and Peter Attia, Sami Inkinen suggests any endurance athlete can become fat adapted and deliver performances that may be superior to carb-fuelled efforts all of the way up to anaerobic intensity. This is a new and growing research space, one AUT is testing, among other Universities around the globe.
Strong, lean and awesome at 41y.

Strong, lean and awesome at 41y.

 

PS What the Fat Sports Performance – currently an ebook, about to be published is one I can’t WAIT to read as well – sure to be a goody.

Antioxidant use and the athlete: should you or shouldn’t you?

There is nothing more disappointing than doing everything you possibly can to prepare for an event… and then the week before you wake up with a scratchy throat. Panic sets in. WTF?! You’ve been diligent about rugging up before heading out for your training. You’ve gotten extremely adept at opening the fridge in your staffroom with your elbow, and the unexpected benefit of not touching the escalator handrail is that your balance has improved exponentially. All of that, along with religiously popping two of those yummy fizzy orange lollies masquerading as vitamin C tablets daily to fight those pesky free radicals that your body is subjected to week in, week out as part of your normal training load. Yet this feels like the beginning of a worrying week pre-race that could derail what was looking like a PB race.

The problem with being an athlete is that you’re constantly teetering on the edge of becoming sick – when you add training on top of an already busy life load, you run the risk of becoming run down and, for some, chronically so. It must be said, though, that athletes are often the least likely to come down with the winter ills. Regular training affords us positive adaptations in cardiovascular, skeletal muscle and respiratory systems, which benefit both everyday wellbeing and prevent against metabolic diseases.  However, despite the undeniable health benefits, exercise increases the production of free radicals in your body, and in excess these may promote increased oxidative stress and damage in the DNA structure. This leads to impaired skeletal tissue function and increased muscle pain, affecting our ability to train and thus perform. Not to mention looking about 81 years old when you’re barely 50. Hmm… there are definite downsides to training. In order to combat this, many athletes and sports professionals have a regular regime of antioxidant supplements (such as vitamin C) they take daily as part of their overall training strategy.

While there can be benefits with taking additional supplements, there are questions around the usefulness of these for athletes. Recently it’s been established that, contrary to strengthening our resilience against illness, we may be doing ourselves a disservice, as physical activity itself causes adaptations in the tissue and increases the expression of receptors that are responsible for producing our internal antioxidant defenses. This stress is important to help us become stronger for the next session, and thus become fitter (termed mitohormesis.)  A recent study investigating this concept also found that regardless of training status, supplementing with antioxidants blunted the ability of exercise to increase insulin sensitivity, and the release of adinopectin, a hormone with a role in blood glucose regulation and fatty acid oxidation.

Does this mean, then, that you should throw away your vitamin C tablets? Actually – to my mind, no. There is a time and place for additional antioxidant supplementation and a blanket approach, taken as an insurance to ward off ills is not the answer. In the literature, there are questions around the use of antioxidants and, like a lot of scientific trials involving humans, this stems from methodological differences, alongside individual differences which garner different results. Many studies didn’t control for overall diet, the training status of the participants differed, along with the definition of ‘endurance’ – I know that many people would view a definition of ‘training 4-5 x per week for up to 60 minutes at a time’ does not an endurance athlete make. The active ingredient in the supplement along with the way it is formulated can also affect the absorption and thus its effectiveness.

There are times in your training cycle where it’s beneficial to expose your body to the adaptive effects of training – as you’re building up your base your body is undergoing many of these, learning to go longer, lift heavier, potentially go faster. This is not the time to take the supplement, as your main goal is to become a better athlete through these changes. In the lead up to the race, however, the adaptive phase is done. Your main concern is getting to the start line in as good a condition as possible. Consider taking a supplement in the week leading up to the event to protect your antioixidant status (which will undoubtedly give you a psychological boost). In addition, it appears that particularly after an event, antioxidant status is reduced (which makes sense, given the stress that racing places on the body) and ensuring a nutrient rich diet with additional supplementation makes sense in the few days afterwards. There are no guidelines around dosage in the literature, but a supplement in a chelated form (along with an amino acid, perhaps powdered form) will help absorption of a vitamin C supplement.

Of course, throughout your normal diet, however, there is much more benefit to take on board these nutrients in their natural state. Vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals that work as antioxidants in the body work in a synergy that can’t be emulated by a pill. While there is increasing interest in the use of ‘functional foods’ such as gogi berries, black tart cherry juice, beetroot juice and the like, your antioxidant status is enhanced through consuming an abundance of nutrient-dense foods that provide this synergy, and there are plenty of studies to show this.

In addition to the numerous vegetable and fruit sources of these constituents, animal based foods are more nutrient dense with regards to cofactors responsible for decreasing oxidative stress in the body. Free range eggs, naturally occurring fats, fish, meat, all contribute either antioxidants themselves (such as co-enzyme q 10 and glycine) or provide the proteins necessary to build our body’s own antioxidant defense. It goes without saying that removing seed oils and processed foods which contribute to the omega-6 load of our diet (thus promoting inflammation) is an important factor here.

Of course, as an athlete, diet is just one factor that contributes to your ability to fight off infection. If you’re not getting adequate sleep, ensuring your training sessions include enough recovery to enable your body to adapt to the training stress, and allowing some downtime in every day life outside of training to just relax, then your risk of coming down with a cold or flu at this time of year will exponentially increase. That said and done, if you do feel the beginnings of a scratchy throat? One of the best things you can do is take a tonic. Check out this below that Chris Kresser talked about. Sounds potent, but it does the trick for him. Many people swear by ginger, manuka honey and lemon to help ward off colds, and ginger is well known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as is manuka honey.

(over to Chris for the last word…)

“Juice 1 kg pf ginger in a juicer. And then you put 3 to 4 tablespoons of ginger in a cup with the juice of one lemon and some honey, like a couple of teaspoons or a tablespoon of honey, and you sip on that all day.  You’ll probably need to make it a couple more times throughout the day, but you just keep sipping it throughout the whole day.  It’s really intense, that much fresh ginger juice.  You’ll really understand when people say that ginger is spicy when you drink that!  You sprinkle a tiny bit of cayenne pepper, like a pinch of it, too.  That really helps a lot.  The fresh ginger is antiviral, and it actually prevents the adhesion of the virus to the upper respiratory mucosa.  If you do it right at the beginning of getting sick, it can really prevent you from getting sick at all. Taken 3-5 times a day. That’s enough for two people over 1.5 days, might make 2-3 batches.”

 

Keto update week 4: same old, actually!

Four weeks in…. how do I feel? This morning I could have turned a corner, I had an awesome run. If you had asked me yesterday, I would have said: hard to say – actually the same as what I have the last couple of weeks really. My sleep has been better than ever, other than a couple of nights but I put that down to life events and not diet related. Interestingly, I feel that I’ve started letting myself relax more in some instances. For example, I will come to the end of the day and typically I’m doing client or AUT related work in the evening. However I’ve been better at being disciplined about just going to bed and not thinking that I must finish X, Y, Z before doing so. I don’t necessarily think this has been as a result of the change in eating directly. But I do think that when you’re forced to step out of normal routines and reflect on them, it is hard to isolate it to just one area. And it’s fair to say I’ve been doing a bit of reflection lately on a lot of things. Perhaps that is just a product of that.

My day to day energy has been up and down, but again, I think it’s just that I’ve got a lot going on and it’s the impact of feeling stretched in many different directions. My training has been interesting. I’ve noticed that I seem to feel awesome up until about an hour, therefore probably push it a bit on that hour, then I seem to all of a sudden die. I’m still only doing long runs of up to 90-95 minutes, with a lot of my sessions being 60 minutes or less. That’s a bit of a change too actually. Being an endurance girl, it’s hard to take a step back from that – and 15 years of being hardwired in thinking that ‘the longer the better’ particularly where both fitness and body weight is concerned, this could be the toughest nut of all to crack. It’s right up there with the ‘fat makes you fat’ thinking. And this n=1 experiment is certainly teaching me how absolutely wrong that last statement is. I will always train – my head requires it more than my body does and actually my head often does my body a disservice because of it. But the physical effects of this diet necessitates me to reduce the amount of time spent training. That, combined with other commitments, has meant that I’ve had to be okay with not doing as much. Surprisingly, this hasn’t been as difficult as I imagined.

What is my general diet over this ketogenic experiment?

Breakfast is a mix between a chia/coconut cream/cream pudding with a small piece of fruit (like feijoa), or it’s been eggs (mix of scrambled, omelette – ditching the whites, poached) with added avocado, cheese, some greens. The rhubarb crumble with cream has been a favourite.

Lunch has been salad greens, leftover meat with dressing, nuts, some cheese – watching my protein component carefully, and the overall volume of salad is a lot smaller than it would normally.

Dinner has been a mix of vegetables that have been roasted (i.e. swede chips), mashed (cauliflower), creamed (spinach with creme fraiche), and meat. I was staying with my Dad this week in Dunedin and he loved that I added cream and balsamic vinegar to the mushrooms and bacon we had at dinner. Not a ‘Mikki’ thing to do.

I’ve been snacking on macadamia nuts and cheese, adding cream to coffee. I thought I would be fancy and order a vienna, but I had to explain to a café what a ‘vienna’ coffee was.. FYI, a vienna is whipped cream and cinnamon. However, I suspect that ordering a vienna is akin to ordering a ‘cappuccino’ (i.e. not the choice of serious coffee drinkers) after getting mocked by my friend Ash. My friend Chris put me on to this sugar-free Well Naturally chocolate which I have to say is delicious. I’ve actually avoided products like this for the better part of 18 months, and am not sure why I feel the need for it now. But I do.

So that’s me in a nutshell. I am waiting for the feeling of amazing energy; that has yet to happen despite my ketones being around 1 mmol/L every time I’ve measured them, bar twice, after being hungry and eating too much twice in the evening. I suspect that it’s easy to go out of ketosis in that instance, and have read Peter Attia saying the same thing. On those days I recognised that teaching across two campuses on opposite sides of the city, combined with seeing clients, left me little time to prepare, and I suffered for it. I am measuring these less, though, as I become more confident in my choices to ensure a ketotic state (and more mindful of just how expensive those ketone strips are).

My friend Bee is also undertaking the ketogenic experiment. Bee is an amazing athlete who has seen considerable success in Ironman over the last few years, taking some time out right now to focus on her career. Out of the five friends that I hit up, she was the one that dived in boots and all. I asked her a few questions three weeks into it to see how she was feeling.

1.      I know I asked you to do this (keto) but what made you give it a go?

Firstly, I’ve been following the inspiring Bevan McKinnon’s Fatman Ironman campaign over the last couple of years (beginning with the disaster that occurred last year, to the turnaround performance at Ironman New Zealand 2014), and reading his blog on Fitter Facebook page sparked some interest. It makes sense to me, and I want to feel like that when I race again!

And I’m curious. I am a carb burner. I have a high carb diet and when training and racing I relied heavily on carbs, sweet yummy triple caffeinated chocolate bomb power gels (from the health food stores of course!). I almost believe I won’t be able to change energy sources and burn fat, it’s too different. So I am keen to see what can happen.

2.      What is a typical day’s food prior to keto?

When the news first started to trickle through that fat was now ‘ok’ I was stoked and I celebrated with the re-introduction of butter, cream and full fat meats into my diet… but I was the typical mainstream observer and didn’t really cut out many carbs or sugar treats, other than switching cereals to pumpkin / root vegetables for breakfast (yes weird), and from sandwiches to wraps for lunch. Dinners were typically meat/fish and vegetables.  I would eat frequent but smaller servings of chocolate and cakes or sweets each day, I have/ or more so I had a seemingly uncontrollable sweet tooth. When I was a kid I used to want to own a lolly shop when I grew up so that I could have endless supplies of sweet goodness.

3.      What is a typical day’s food now on keto?

Lots of good yummy foods. Breakfast is a variation of eggs, coconut cream, cheese and vegetables. I have them as omelettes, scrambled, or using mushroom or avocado instead of toast.

Lunch is a salad with leafy greens and salad vegetables, protein could be smoked salmon or smoked chicken, eggs or just macadamia nuts. All mixed with cheese and garlic infused oil, tahini or aioli.

Dinner meat and vegetables (dependent on carb allowance) and cheese and oils.

I’m loving the food choices and have not been eating any sugar or sweeteners, I haven’t wanted to.

4.      What have been the main challenges to changing to a keto diet? (energy, appetite, sleep, training …)

The diet itself is surprisingly really easy to follow, I’ve been weighing food where possible and while a little annoying, it’s not the end of the world.  When I’m out I just do the best I can with what’s available, I’m not going to take this so far that the diet prevents a meal out.

The biggest challenge has been in my running and I’m finding it pretty annoying. I have slowed down a lot, I’m missing the extra gear I used to have. I can’t keep up with my usual running pals, forcing them to do hill repeats so I can catch them up (good to see them suffer though). On many runs I’ve wanted to throw the towel in and just eat a damned sandwich. But this is just part of the experiment to see if this carb burner can change.

5.      What, if any, benefits have you seen in the three weeks since going keto?

I don’t eat sugar. I don’t think about sugar. I admit I still walk into a café and drool at the sweet goodness of cakes and cronuts, but I don’t finish a meal and think hmmm a bit of chocolate would go down well right now.  If you could only understand what a change this is for me, if I gain anything from this change in diet the shift from sugar is more than enough. Happy days.

Keto diet update: week 2.

I wasn’t going to post again about my ketogenic experiment. Well, not immediately. However after getting 28 more followers of my blog in the last week, I figured that perhaps this was something people were interested in hearing more about. It makes sense. A ketogenic diet is the extreme version of a low carbohydrate diet. And when you combine the words ‘diet’ and ‘extreme’ in reference to an eating pattern, then that’s bound to spark some interest. Think ‘magic bullet’ It’s like Beyonce endorsing the lemon detox diet. Except she likely received a hefty payout for the pleasure of losing 9 kg in 7 days (to then gain it all back… but who’s counting?) I’m still waiting on my cheque. Not sure who to contact, however. Within the last week I have delved further into the information I have around what constitutes a ketogenic diet. How much of what we read on the internet is in fact ‘ketogenic’ and how much is someone’s misinterpretation of it?

For example, there are a few websites that provide information on the ratio of carbohydrate (CHO) and protein to fat that you should aim for when adopting a ketogenic diet. This keto calculator here gives a good overview of the information that should potentially be taken into account when providing structure to the diet. I used this as a starting point with regards to CHO and protein, and adjusted the fat grams per day so the end result wasn’t a hefty calorie deficit leading to unwanted weight loss. However, as that is the end goal for a good number of people, it will provide some idea of the macronutrient totals. On that note, there is a misconception that you can eat fat ‘ad lib’ and you will lose weight or – at the very least – not gain it. That’s just not the case. I know many people who have dabbled in ketosis and have not been successful with their desire to lose weight, whereas others have found the weight has literally dropped off. Of course, as ketogenic diets are the extreme end of a low carbohydrate, high fat (LCHF) diet, there are many people who have lost weight just by opting to include more real food in their diet and have spontaneously eaten less due to the higher satiety factor, without the need to meticulously count macronutrient grams, weigh food portions or think twice before eating out.  This can be a source of frustration for others who have committed to doing all of the aforementioned but have not had the same experience. I did wondered if part of this is to do with the macronutrient ratios – that their protein and/or CHO grams are too high to truly get into ketosis and enable the body to adapt to burning fat. I emailed Stephen Phinney – one of the world’s experts in the ketogenic diet and co-founder of the Art and Science of Low Carb – a website where you can find information on the research he has conducted and the books he has authored with Jeff Volek and Eric Westman. His response?

The simple answer is that if your ketones are above 0.5 mM and after a meal you are satiated (while keeping protein in the area of 1.5 g/kg), then you have got your diet right.  Rather than trying to prescribe fat intake in grams or ratios, it works best to eat fat to satiety.  In this regard, it is important to recognize and manage ‘fat hunger’ by having high fat items available so that one is not tempted to over-eat protein.

And that makes sense -so potentially it has less to do with the ratios as a rule, however they are the starting point for some people and could help if they are having trouble regulating their protein intake. For some, however, merely recommending they eat fat to ‘satiety’ is too difficult for them to put into practice successfully and still lose weight. It is entirely possible to get into ketosis and have blood ketones above the 0.5 mM that illustrates they are being used as the predominant fuel source. However, the amount of fat consumed is in excess of what they need, and the fat that is used for energy is provided by the diet, therefore there is no physiological requirement for burning body fat. Frustratingly, despite meticulously counting macronutrient ratios, watching protein portions and being mindful of situations that could blow them out of ketosis, those jeans are not getting any looser.

While managing fat hunger is the key, it’s really difficult for some to recognise their fat hunger – as this is relying more on the physiological signals sent by the body in response to the food eaten. For many people, the hormones responsible (insulin and leptin being the predominant ones) are either disrupted due to poor metabolic health and/or being overridden in the context of the food environment they have been exposed to for most of their life. The food choices that have been part of a ‘healthy, balanced diet’ have constituents that drive appetite and feed into our food/reward system in the brain that extend far beyond our physiological needs. Couple that with ingrained behaviour whereby we must eat what is in front of us, it is rude to decline a piece of home made cake, and those around us comment on what we choose to eat or not to eat, it is no wonder many people have lost touch with their true appetite.

As with any change in diet, it’s such a good time to assess the effects of those environmental cues on your own appetite and adjust where necessary. Serving smaller portions is a great start when following a ketogenic diet, as fat is naturally more satiating. Chewing food properly and finishing a mouthful is also key. For some, putting their knife and fork down in between bites is a good way to do this. Eating without distractions is often recommended, though some can read/browse the internet while still being mindful of their food intake – so use your honest judgement here.

I’m also learning a lot about my own dietary habits and how a change in eating has affected other things. In no particular order, these include:

1. For the first time in memory I’ve been consistently sleeping through the night. I mentioned this last week but in the last seven days I’ve slept through the night on all but one occasion. I put this down to a reduction in vegetables that I’ve been eating. Don’t go thinking I’m vegetable free – at ALL! I’d easily meet the 5-a-day recommendation for me, you and that person who sitting over there on a normal day. Now I’d probably just meet mine and yours. This reduction in water means I’m no longer getting up in the middle of the night and despite the fact that humans likely didn’t sleep throughout the night back in paleolithic times, I’m loving the uninterrupted sleep I’m getting.

2. While I was meticulously weighing my food portions in the first 10 days, I’ve reached a point where it’s easy for me to eyeball amounts. I have eaten out a few times over the holiday period, stayed at a friend’s house for three nights and maintained my ketone levels between 0.7 mM and 3.9 mM.

3. Training hasn’t been that bad, aside from an almost repeat of last Friday’s run. This time it was on trails and I knew within two minutes it was going to be a long 90 minutes. I believe this was down to dehydration actually – my heart rate shot up immediately, then settled, though was still a hard run. There has been a slight decrease in strength for my weight training also. However I’m a bit slack on that front so there are obviously confounding variables (as with all of this…) These have been offset by some awesome sessions too.

4. Throughout the day my energy levels drop off markedly – more than usual I believe. I think this will change as I adapt. I understand, according to Steve Phinney, that it can take up to 12 weeks for that to occur. Perhaps this is longer than a four week experiment.

5. Peter Attia, The Eating Acadamy, is a WEALTH of information – the posts are just the start of it. He is amazing with his responses in the comments sections and I’m learning a lot there. Go over and check it out if at all interested.

6. It took about a 10 day period to get my head around the smaller portions and that they would be filling enough. The reason why I ate so many vegetables is down to being a calorie-counter for over half of my life. As vegetables are low energy, nutrient dense, I relied on them to fill me up. This clearly goes hand in hand with the ingrained dietary fat phobia for the same time period and my tertiary education in nutrition. If you think it’s hard to get your head around a high fat diet, try having the nutrition qualification at the same time. THAT is a challenge ;). Whilst I’ve made massive dietary shifts over the last 18 months, this experiment has been as much about what I’d experience psychologically as it has been physically. I have read the science that clearly shows fat doesn’t make you fat. I tell people on a daily basis that fat doesn’t make them fat. I have had clients and friends who have upped their fat intake (within and outside of the ketogenic diet) and have seen them improve or maintain an already good body composition throughout. Perhaps for some, seeing that with their own eyes would be convincing enough. It wasn’t for me. However, after 13 days on a ketogenic diet, one kilogram down from when I started,

7. Fat – from between 130g – 200g per day depending on the day, in the form of cream, nuts, low carb desserts, olive oil, coconut oil, butter, cheese, coconut cream – is not making me fat.

So… have you gone all keto?

Yes. But unlike my decision to ‘go paleo’ this was a predetermined, calculated, conscious decision and not ‘by default’, which is how my whole food philosophy came about. And that’s largely because it would be very difficult to just ‘go keto’ without some predetermined, calculated, conscious decision making occurring. Although, with the wisdom that is obviously gained from now 9 days of carbohydrate and protein restriction, and the consumption of vastly increased grams of fat I am pretty sure a lot of people out there who believe they are ketogenic might not be – if the websites devoted to keto foods and recipes are anything to go by. How on earth would they be in ketosis with protein portions that large??

Now why would I bother jumping on the keto bandwagon? A few reasons. A lot of people I know have tried it and I’ve reached a point where I’m curious enough to see if I had the discipline to follow such a strict dietary regime (regime is a rather harsh word, but I feel it’s applicable for this diet). Whilst some people observe what I eat and exclaim how ‘disciplined’ I am (like it’s a virtue), I love what I eat and eat what I want – eating a real food diet isn’t about discipline, it’s about pleasure. The strict limits on not only carbohydrate but protein requires discipline largely reserved for the very analytical and uber intelligent (i.e. Peter Attia over at Eating Academy).

The second reason is self experimentation – a far cry from the days I mocked people for using the term n=1, I now wanted to experience, document and reflect on how it feels to undertake a ketogenic diet. A great way to learn and understand anything is to experience it. My weight and body image issues growing up, for example, have provided me with better insight into the challenges faced by clients who battle with similar problems, despite the fact that, physically, we may look very different. As a number of my clients now have heard of a ketogenic diet and just want to try it, or have legitimate health reasons that warrant a ketogenic approach as a tool to improve metabolic health markers, then to be able to speak from experience is obviously advantageous.

The final reason is because Caryn gave it a go. And therefore, out of those left in our research team at Human Potential Centre who had yet to follow a ketogenic diet, I was the only person left who had yet to try it. Other than Scott. And as he is still drinking energy drinks (albeit he’s switched to the sugar free variety, and swigs water after having it to protect his teeth), it’s fair to say our respective diets are poles apart at this point. However he has recently jumped on the Twitter bandwagon so I’m sure it won’t be too long before he’s swigging bottles of MCT oil and professing the benefits of butter like it’s nobody’s business. However, I am a nutritionist and, as the last one standing I felt not a small amount of FOMO by having not at least tried it. I’m actually in the best position out of my colleagues – as I can learn from their mistakes. Like I did at St Johns. As a cadet in my younger years we had regional competitions that required assessing a medical emergency and stitching or bandaging people up with the one who illustrated the most knowledge walking away with the trophy. As my last name is Williden I was usually last to front up, and my St John’s group would filter information to me so, by the time it was my turn, I was armed with all necessary information to go into the medical situation and assess, inform, and bandage with skills that would make me an indispensable member of McDreamy’s team. This ketogenic diet experiment is not dissimilar, minus the trophy and the badge to stitch on my jersey.

So Day 9… A short time, sure. But I’ve learned a few things already.

  1. It’s hard to stick to the protein limit. Really hard. I got an inkling of that when I read Tim Noakes’ Real Meal Revolution recommendation of keeping animal protein to 80g per meal absolute amounts. But who also knew vegetables contained so much protein?
  2. That it is hard to get the amount of fat necessary for ketosis and overeat. My food volume has dramatically reduced. Obviously, though, if you do eat more fat than you need, this will be reflected in weight gain/gastrointestinal problems etc over the long term.
  3. That I’d wildly underestimated the amount of peanut/almond/coconut butter I actually ate in normal life (like somehow the Gilmours 3kg bags of nuts just disappeared of their own accord). I’ve never tracked my food to this extent (using Easy Diet Diary app for iPhone) and it is a real eye opener.
  4. That not all food apps are created equal. For example, Fitday lists broccoli has having almost as much carbohydrate as pumpkin. It doesn’t.
  5. That for some people to get into ketosis, 50g of carbohydrate (CHO) might be too high, and closer to 30g is better. Is this a female thing? Maybe. This is clearly insight from Caryn who passed this on. While the academic literature often places limits of 20-30g CHO/day,  there are also studies that refer to a low carbohydrate, high protein diet as ‘ketogenic.’ Confusion is clearly not limited to the bloggersphere.
  6. There is a lot of misinformation on the Internet about ketogenic diets. But there are some very smart people writing about this – way smarter and knowledgeable than I am.
  7. People are unnecessarily verbose in recipes and post too many ‘stages’ pictures.
  8. That, despite being my dislike of Thai food and Thai restaurants, I really like my own Thai red curry coconut chicken. (I must be the only person who doesn’t like Thai food. I know. Is it the cheesy American cover songs and proliferation of sweet chilli sauce? Maybe).
  9. That making pastry is way easier than I ever realized.
  10. That if you decide to make pastry to turn that chicken curry into a pie, you should probably check that you own a rolling pin (or a good substitute) first
  11. That I make really good rhubarb crumble and chicken curry pie. These and other recipes are over on my Facebook nutrition page – definitely check them out.

Other thoughts:

  1. Training wise – I’ve felt great. Up until Friday and then it felt like I’d been turned upside down and emptied out. Hardest. Run. Ever. Barely breaking 5.30 k’s (actually that’s an estimate – thankfully Nicky’s evil Garmin wasn’t working and I was too scared to wear mine). Friday and Saturday were complete write offs but today’s run – storming. Seriously. Even after doing weights yesterday I woke up feeling better than I have in a long time.
  2. During normal day: I’ve felt flat. A bit sick on some days too – and particularly on the days when I missed having a coffee with cream, or something similar, which reduces amount of fat I start the day with. But, again, today I feel back to being awesome.
  3. Twice during the week I woke up and couldn’t get back to sleep for an hour. Unusual for me, though not unheard of. Last night I slept right through. This may be due to the diet, might have nothing to do with it.
  4. I miss fruit. And dates. And wine (for now – I’m abstaining for now, given that alcohol is preferentially metabolized in the body – which would largely offset my efforts to turn fat into the go-to fuel tank).
  5. While I, like many people, have my go-to foods, nine days into this and I’ve needed a bit of variety to keep me focused. I typically eat a TON of vegetables, and would feel largely dissatisfied to sit down to a third of that with extra dressing added as a fat source.
  6. It’s a shame that I’m making all these awesome meals and I have yet to meet my future husband. He is seriously missing out on some good eats.

I know. I’m late to the party on this. Just like the paleo/real food/whole food movement, I’m pontificating on something that some of you reading this would have read about, adopted, wrote about, reflected on and then moved on five years ago. If this is you, and you have some wise words then please share! This is a learning curve for me (and clients) so the more I know the better.

So I’m hoping for that ‘keto’ clarity, that ethereal experience people talk about, and that today’s run was indicative of the amazing training that I will experience as I undergo this keto experiment. (It goes without saying that this will of course turn me into an amazing athlete lol) I’m also hoping that my experience will add to the information out there that seems, for the most part, from the male experience. There are a few women writing about it, but it is largely a male dominated space. I will keep you updated, both here and on my Facebook page. Right. Off to make keto hot cross buns. Because nothing says Easter like almond flour buns dressed with a white cross.