Random porridge post

I have been having a bit of a hankering for porridge – it’s cold and winter, after all. But I’m one of these people who, after having oats, has a blood sugar plummet within an hour – even with a decent hit of protein powder added which should help stabilise my blood sugars and keep me full.

So over the last few years I’ve been having some porridge alternatives. Here’s five that I have found to be quite delicious that I mentioned on our Fitter Radio podcast.

(PS Have loads more like this (and completely different ones!) – sign up to my monthly meal plans and online nutrition coaching to get plans, recipes, shopping lists and access to my brain through a messaging service, emails and a Facebook member’s page 🙂 )

  1. Flaxseed chia porridge: good fats, good protein and will keep you full
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Flaxseed chia porridge

2. Banana chai porridge: a nice spicy sweet start to the day (you won’t notice the cauliflower)

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Banana chai porridge

3. Almond butter porridge: grain free and filling

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Almond butter porridge

4. Lewis’ chia porridge: fuelling an endurance athlete who has type 1 diabetes since ages ago

5. Walnut chia porridge: seriously delicious, you won’t be missing oats with this one

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Walnut chia porridge

14 reasons to ditch the toast and jam (and 7 key tips to help you do this).

After feeling like I’d taken a trip back to 2003 with some of the sports nutrition posts and articles I’d been reading lately, I got tagged in a cool picture from a listener of our Fitter Radio podcast  – a triathlete who has switched from the traditional higher carb, lower fat diet approach to eating lower carb, higher fat, real food whilst training and commented she ‘didn’t know her 41 year old body could be the best body I have ever had’ (Woot! high fives all around!!) This coincided with finishing Mark Sisson’s Primal Endurance book.

Mark outlines 115 reasons why athletes should train and eat the Primal Endurance way. I concurred with pretty much all of them. I have added my own 2c worth, added some literature below (and cut it down to 21 for brevity’s sake). While geared towards athletes, hands down this is applicable to everyone. Everyone.

So if you’re currently eating toast and jam pre OR post training (or in general), I’ve outlined the 14 reasons why you need to ditch that junk and become a fat burning beast, and 7 key tips to help you get there.

  1. Western diet is based on excess grains and sugars (and low fibre) which stimulates excess insulin production, leading to lifelong insidious weight gain, chronic inflammation and elevated disease risk factors.
  2. A high carb, grain-based diet can leave endurance athletes nutrient deficient (due to phytic acid effects on minerals), inflamed and more susceptible to the oxidative damage of the stress of training, general life and poor nutrition.
  3. The way that most people consume modern grains (cereals, breads, pasta) ends up being a cheap source of calories which are immediately turned into glucose upon ingestion and offer minimal nutritional value. There are no good reasons to consume these types of grains and many good reasons not to, especially for those who are sensitive to gluten and other anti-nutrients found in wheat.
  4. Everyone is sensitive to the health compromising effects of grains at some level, especially the pro-inflammatory effects of gluten and the propensity for the lectins in grains to cause leaky gut syndrome.
  5. Even lean people suffer from the consequences of carbohydrate dependency, such as chronic inflammation, oxidative damage, and accelerated ageing and disease risk factors.
  6. Carrying excess body fat despite careful attention to diet and a high training load is largely due to carbohydrate dependency caused by a grain-based diet and chronic training patterns.
  7. Carbohydrate dependency cycle looks like this: consume a high carbohydrate meal – elevate bloods sugar – stimulate an insulin response – shut off fat metabolism and promote fat storage – experience fatigue and sugar cravings – low blood sugar elicits stress response and we consume more carbohydrates – stimulate the fight or flight response to regulate blood sugar – dysregulate and exhaust assorted hormonal processes, and end up in burnout and weight gain (potentially lifelong)
  8. Weight loss through portion control, low fat foods and calorie burning is ineffective long term. And while we think calories burned through exercise stimulate a corresponding increase in appetite – research might not back this up. I tend to think that people are more likely to eat more because they ‘reward’ themselves OR the long slow training allows increased opportunity to eat sports ‘junk food’ and the amount of calories burnt through training is far less than you think – and overestimated more so in females in certain instances. At any rate, the secret to weight loss is hormone optimisation, primarily through moderating excess insulin production.
  9. Endurance athletes can begin to dial in to their optimal carbohydrate intake by asking themselves the question ‘do I carry excess body fat?’ Any excess body fat calls for a reduction in dietary carbohydrate intake to accelerate fat burning.
  10. Endurance athletes who already have an optimal body composition but are looking to optimise training and recovery should choose high nutrient value carbohydrates. These include a high volume of vegetables, a moderate fruit intake, kumara/potatoes and other starchy tubers, dairy for those that tolerate, wild rice, quinoa and small amounts of dark chocolate.
  11. Endurance athletes with high calorie needs who also have an optimal body composition can enjoy occasional treats, but the habit of unbridled intake of nutrient-deficient carbohydrates should be eliminated in the interest of health and performance.
  12. Primal style eating (or eating minimally processed foods) is fractal and intuitive, and when escaping carbohydrate dependency and becoming fat adapted, you don’t have to rely on ingested carbs for energy. Eating patterns can be driven by hunger, pleasure and maximal nutritional benefit.
  13. Escaping sugar dependency and becoming fat adapted gives you a cleaner burning engine, since glucose burning promotes inflammation and increased oxidative stress
  14. Ketones are an internally generated, energy rich by-product of fat metabolism in the liver when blood glucose and insulin levels are low due to carbohydrate restriction in the diet. Ketones are burned efficiently by the brain, heart and skeletal tissue in the same manner as glucose. You do not need to be on a ketogenic diet to upregulate your ability to produce ketones – you can do this via a lower carbohydrate approach.

HOW TO DO THIS: 7 KEY TIPS

  1. Step one: omit sugars, grains, industrial seed oils for 21 days. Step two: emphasis highly nutritious foods such as meat, poultry, vegetables, eggs, nuts, fish, fruits, some full fat dairy, seeds, and kumara/potato.
  2. 100g or less of carbohydrate promotes fat loss, 150g is around maintenance level and over this could promote lifelong weight gain and over 300g could promote disease patterns.
  3. While transitioning to primal there are some struggles initially due to lifelong carbohydrate dependency and the addictive (for some) properties of sugar and excess grains and wheat. Headaches, dehydration, lower blood pressure and ‘dead legs’ are all initial side effects when removing processed food. Trust me – this too will pass.
  4. To minimise side effects, start the transition in a base-training phase of your training where training occurs at an easy pace. The transition phase can take anywhere from 2-12 weeks initially.
  5. Consume salt. Don’t underestimate the importance of this! Lower circulating insulin affects your body’s ability to retain sodium (and other electrolytes) – so we need more, particularly as processed food (of which you are no longer basing your diet around) is where you got around 70% of your sodium from.
  6. You can accelerate the process of fat adaptation by instigating some of the tactics used by athletes who opt to ‘train low’ – i.e. in a low glycogen training state. Some of these are naturally undertaken if you train without eating in the morning, or work out after dinner in the evening and don’t consume anything post-workout. If you’re new to this, have a read through to establish which might suit you best, and start instigating 1-2 x per week. Don’t undertake all of them as this aggressive approach could cause too much additional stress, derailing your plans to become a fat-burning beast.
  7. The FASTER study and Peter Attia, Sami Inkinen suggests any endurance athlete can become fat adapted and deliver performances that may be superior to carb-fuelled efforts all of the way up to anaerobic intensity. This is a new and growing research space, one AUT is testing, among other Universities around the globe.
Strong, lean and awesome at 41y.

Strong, lean and awesome at 41y.

 

PS What the Fat Sports Performance – currently an ebook, about to be published is one I can’t WAIT to read as well – sure to be a goody.

An endurance athlete’s ‘real food’ success story: making it work for you.

I got this email this week from a client that I have worked with since just before mid-year. She is an endurance athlete that came to me as her overall energy levels were low and she was carrying a few extra kilograms that she wasn’t used to.

We chatted through not only nutrition but lifestyle-related changes that she could make to help support her busy lifestyle. This included changes to her diet, additional supplemental support, working on sleep-related behaviours and finding the middle ground between ensuring adequate energy levels and losing body fat to a level that was sustainable and achievable. You can appreciate this is a delicate balance! I discussed with her that when we sorted her energy levels, the body fat loss would take care of itself – she was aware of this and that her energy levels were the priority.

As an endurance athlete she often trained at both ends of the day and came home late, stayed up a little later than she thought she should, and relied quite a bit on carbohydrate-based choices such as bread and cereal to boost her energy levels during the day. While she didn’t recognise it, I immediately flagged this as one of the reasons she was feeling exhausted. She was also hungry a lot, eating at multiple times during the day. This was another indicator that her food choices were not geared towards an optimal balance of good quality carbohydrate, protein and fat. A detailed discussion on her diet proved this to be true.

This client was very motivated to feel better, and took the suggestions that I made and found a way to work them into her lifestyle. We had four sessions together, the last being just before a race that she was doing – the first one for her in a while.

I asked if she minded if I shared her email – she was happy for me to do so.

“Thanks for the item on Thyroid on Fitter Radio this week – it was really helpful. Good to know low thyroid is not something you are necessarily stuck with for life.

Following our catch-up at the end of September I just thought I’d update you with how things have gone since then, and where I have found a really comfortable place with training and nutrition.

Update:

So in summary, I performed well at my last race and was very happy with my placing in my age group. I really noticed that getting extra sleep made a big difference to how I felt, two nights before the race I had 9 hours and felt amazing the next day.

My weight has stabilized at around 53kg so I think this is possibly the happy place for my body, and it’s the same as it was a couple of years ago when I was running at my best.  I feel good at this level and I’ve figured out how to keep it there – for me it’s:

  • at least 7.5 hours sleep;
  • not eating late; and
  • doing some kind of activity in the evening, even if that’s just a walk.

Food wise, what seems to be working and manageable is:

Prep: (crucial to ensuring that I’ve got options available during the week):

  • Bulk making a week’s smoothies at the weekend, then freezing and using during the week
  • Ordering Primal Kitchen for weekday lunches and weekend main meals
  • Making a few wraps at the weekend for weekdays when I do something straight after work. For example, Farrah chia wrap* with Vital Vegetables Slaw, lemon juice, a flavour (Thai spice mix, peanut butter or salsa) + a protein such as smoked salmon or chicken

*yes I know it’s has wheat in it and is a carb but it seems to give me enough energy/and is practical – if I eat fewer carbs than I am I don’t seem to have enough energy.  I have tried other things instead of a wrap like cabbage leaves/sushi sheets/… but they just don’t work as well, they fall apart. The thing that does work is the Vietnamese rice paper wraps but they are very fiddly so I would tend to buy the Farrah wraps instead – very good place in central Wellington to get them! 

Breakfast – usually 5:30-6:30 depending on day

  • Smoothie and a hot drink + a spoon of peanut butter – I usually make the smoothie quite thick and eat it out of a bowl with a spoon!
  • If I’m doing something hard-ish like a swim squad or a run/bike then I have something else too. This tends to be either a sachet of plain oat porridge with the smoothie on top, or 2 hard-boiled eggs with some salt (or on a race day 1-2 x banana depending on length or race).

Mid morning – usually have a coffee with rice milk but don’t need to snack much now. If I do it’s 1-2 Brazil nuts

Weekday lunch – usually eaten around 11am-noon

  • Primal kitchen – 1/2 a warrior size shared with partner + handful baby spinach
  • 2 squares of dark chocolate and maybe a couple of strawberries.
  • Raspberry white tea

Mid afternoon – usually have a Redbush tea with rice milk but don’t need to snack now. If I do it’s a carrot and maybe a few almonds.

Weekday dinner – on days when I do something around 5 or 6pm in the evening, I just eat this around 4pm which seems early but it gives me fuel for the activity then I don’t need to eat a meal later. This way I get a semi-fasted thing happening (as per train-low principles) without it feeling hard. And it means I don’t eat a bunch of rubbish in the afternoon. So it works!

  • Wrap
  • 2 squares of dark chocolate
  • Redbush or green tea

Evening – Usually have a hot drink (not caffeinated), and maybe a swig of wine or my partners beer, but I don’t need to snack as much now – if I do it’s because I’ve just been for a hard-ish training session or MTB ride, and, something like a gold kiwi and few nuts does the trick.

Weekends, similar but we have Primal Kitchen in the evening but I try make sure we eat early, like by 6. For lunch something like sardines on toast if at home with salad, or eggs on toast if we are at a cafe.

Overall

It’s working well and although probably to you getting Primal Kitchen for most of our main meals will probably seem like a bit of a cop out!! But actually takes the stress out of everything – otherwise I would end up doing all of the thinking ahead/planning for both of us on food and basically end up spending more of my free time on it which to me wouldn’t feel fair! (My partner is wonderful but he just isn’t as organised as me and has lean genes and the fastest metabolism on earth so can eat anything. To him, super healthy food isn’t so much of a priority). I think it also works out the same cost or cheaper, definitely frees up some time and makes logistics easier. I’m sure at some point in my life I’ll enjoy doing more food prep and cooking more but this works right now and keeps the balance of effort fair!**

I am planning on giving up triathlon after this summer and just focus on running, mostly trail running and doing other stuff I enjoy for fun.

So, that’s it! Thanks for everything and your podcast, the whole experience of getting nutrition consultation has been a really positive one and the result for me has been to shift a good couple of kilograms and change my mental attitude in a very positive way.  🙂 ”

You can see from the discussion of her food choices, her diet isn’t low carbohydrate per se – though it is definitely LOWER in carbohydrates than it was. There is a lot more protein here than what she was having, and overall the nutrient density has improved.

Overall I think this is such a good ‘real food’ success story and that’s why I asked if I could share it. Does she eat ONLY non-processed food? No – however it’s all about context and finding the middle ground with what can be achieved in the context of the individual’s lifestyle.  That, to me, is success. 🙂

Merry Xmas.

 

**to be clear, I don’t think that getting meals from a place like Primal Kitchen (or ordering through My Food Bag etc) is a cop-out at ALL. I think it’s a smart strategy to help people meet their nutrition goals and not fall back into bad habits that could contribute to poor overall health status. It’s really interesting here that it works out MORE cost effective too. It saves on buying food that they would have to throw out as they haven’t found the time to cook it. It also saves the temptation of just having toast or cereal in the evening, or a sandwich that doesn’t provide enough protein and important nutrients. Primal Kitchen is a great choice.

 

Spice it up

One of the benefits of eating real food is that it minimises the amount of processed refined foods that drive the inflammation pathways in the body which, as you know, is the underlying cause of modern chronic disease. From a general health perspective, this is awesome. From an athlete perspective it is even more so – given that the training derived oxidative stress causes cell damage and breakdown, increasing recovery time from sessions. Anything that impedes recovery is not going to allow you to make the fitness gains you are looking for. Of course, it’s more than just diet you have to consider.  I’m three weeks post-marathon and am up to running around 50 minutes every 2-3 days, with calf and foot niggles making me more cautious that what I’ve needed to be in the past. It’s frustrating for me to tell you the truth; yes I enjoy gym work and swimming, but there is nothing I love more than running and when the weather is blossoming into summer and the choice is between a Smith squat machine or Auckland Domain, I’d know where I’d rather be. Worse is that I really only have myself to blame. I’ve pretty much got my diet dialled in (as to be expected – though, no, it’s not perfect as I am human 😉 ) and I honestly have been taking the return to running seriously and listening to both Coach and osteo advice to ease into it. But it’s slower than what I would have imagined. Where I fall down is the recovery out of training – you know, the wind down time, getting enough sleep – that kind of thing. Hence I’ve been making a real effort this week to get to bed early, to practice diaphragmatic breathing whilst driving and to invert my legs up onto the wall at the end of the day and just ‘be’. So it got me thinking about additional ways to support the body outside of the diet, exercise and lifestyle. What other dietary factors can help support the anti-inflammatory pathways in the body outside of a reduction of processed food and the free-radical scavenging properties of fruits, vegetables, animal protein and eggs?

A lot of athletes are heading into heavier schedules with the Christmas holidays allowing for some block training to occur. This is (for some) combined with the increased indulgences of additional alcohol at end-of year drinks and caffeine to get through the day. In combination with late nights and early starts, it’s no wonder that we hang out for December 23 as this time of year can wreak havoc on the body. It’s too easy to think you can pop a Voltaren or Neurofen tablet before going out and training (or at the end of a hard session) to mitigate the niggles and strains you feel that come from a lack of recovery. This might not seem like a big deal at the time but it really does more damage than what you think. I know – I used to be blasé about these things too – I had a ‘stomach of steel’ that was Impenetrable to even the most harshest of substances (there’s few things harder on the stomach than a mixing bowls worth of green gooseberries that I’ve successfully put this away with no ill effect in my younger years). But the older I’ve become, the more digestive issues I’ve struggled with around training, the more aware I’ve become of the impact that anti-inflammatory pharmaceuticals can have on the gut and subsequent health. Training in itself has been found to increase gut permeability. The decreased blood flow to the gut through even moderate steady-state exercise has resulted in intestinal injury and elevated liver enzyme parameters – and that’s an acute effect of just 60 minutes training. You can imagine what your normal high intensity effort or Sunday bunch ride does in relation to tearing up your insides?*  This increased gut permeability is a big deal. The once tight junctures that should not allow foreign matter to travel through are now not-so-tight. When we have foreign bodies allowed into our system this sparks an auto-immune response. Inflammation is one of the body’s first line of defence against injury, and over time this acute inflammatory response can become chronic which leads to deleterious health effects moreso than just impaired recovery. So the training in itself loosens the guts main defence against foreign proteins, which can increase inflammation – and when you throw ibuprofen on top of that, the effects on the gut and inflammation over time are even worse. It’s an easy thing to do, certainly, and a lot of people do it – however over time this can cause sensitivities to foods that you once had no problem digesting. Think grains, milk, certain types of carbohydrates in the FODMAP spectrum. Our gut has just one cell thickness protecting it from the outside environment. It doesn’t take a lot to upset the balance.

Of course, I’m speaking mechanistically here and everyone is different – some people will go through their athletic career and not have an issue at all despite a regular habit of popping vitamin V; others though, will notice that their tolerance to certain foods is now lower, the time taken to recover from training sessions is greater, and they are not able to get as fit as fast as they used to be able to. Is it an age thing? Sure. You’re not as bulletproof as you were in your 20s. But it could be more than that.

So I thought I’d mention some spices that can help support the anti-inflammatory pathways in the body. This isn’t going to dive into the ins and outs of that information – this post is already verging on being too long.

Tumeric (active ingredient curcumin): (particularly in the presence of fat to help absorption) – my friend Chris loves eggs with a heaped teaspoon or two of turmeric, and avocado and butter in the morning.

Ginger (I love ginger tea, just grating it fresh into hot water) and in green smoothies with lemon.

Cinammon: known for helping blood sugar control and also for its anti-inflammatory properties – I always like to include this in my breakfast meals, as a sweetener for baked rhubarb (no sugar required), in a slow cooked meat recipe or mince.

Garlic a member of the sulfur family, a well known anti-inflammatory compound.(okay, not a spice, but worth a mention)

Cayenne and chilli (active compound capsaicin) – chilli flakes and cayenne pepper are great on eggs, in salad and have you tried chilli chocolate? it is Christmas after all.

The beauty of these spices is that they are cheap, readily available and complement perfectly your real food lifestyle. This post is not prescribing anything more than the liberal inclusion of them in your everyday food. Every real food pantry should regularly utilise these in cooking, baking and barbequing. They are not a panacea to burning the candle at both ends – but it is worth your while to spice things up a little bit in the kitchen if you’re not already doing so.

Another mindset shift: (lack of) training for the marathon.

Another marathon ticked off. And this is the first one that I’ve completed as an LCHF athlete. More than that though, it’s the first one I’ve raced on a smaller training load than I thought I needed. And while I say ‘oh, I don’t race’ – in reality, when I step up to the start line and the gun goes off, I am racing. It’s a race against the clock and myself, and not the people around me, though I did earmark one dude on the start line as my nemesis that I wanted to take down – and this had nothing to do with his running ability.  This was purely because he was in a tutu and as soon as I saw him I thought ‘there’s no way I’m letting anyone in a skirt, guy or girl, beat me.’ Rational? Obviously not.

I entered the Queenstown marathon at the start of the year purely because the early bird deal was so good. As a new event, they took $50 off the entry fee for the marathon and, like anyone who likes a bargain*, that was enough for me to sign on the dotted line. Inevitably, though, life and limb gets in the way of any decent build up period for a race and more often than not I’m left with 8-10 weeks to go and starting to panic that I’m not going to have the time for an adequate preparation period. Now any coach would look at that length of time and say that it was ridiculous to think it wasn’t enough time. Physically, of course it is – particularly as it’s not like I’m going from a couch potato to my first marathon; I’ve been running for over 20 years. Psychologically though: different story. Particularly when your compatriots are 6 -8 weeks into their 16 week build plan for an event and ticking off 8-10 km intervals on a Saturday, backed up with a 2h 15min run on a Sunday and I’m high fiving people for completing a 40 min easy run without any nagging sensation in the calf. I’m obviously excited to be running, but daunted by what is ahead in terms of ‘making up’ lost kilometres to get me on an even par with other runners of my ability. It’s easy to talk yourself out of a good race before you’ve even begun to train for it. I know I do. And, even when you do train for it, how many people do you know line up on the start-line with either a niggle, a virus, or lack of preparation to blame their less than ideal finish time on?  Not only do I battle with knowing that others have been able to consistently run at a time where I’ve only been able to do gym work and some swim sessions, but my main problem is that I have a fear of failure. This has been the hardest thing to let go of over the last few years – the expectations that I perceive others have of me and my running ability.  In some ways not having the ideal race build up let me off the hook; it’s a legitimate reason for running slower than others think I’m capable of – and just finishing the race is good enough. Bevan, though, didn’t let me off that easy. He guided my training for the Queenstown marathon and was adamant that 8 weeks was adequate to get me in pretty good shape to get around.

Previously, I would have tried to cram in as much running with intensity as I could tolerate, with a couple of rest days per week, so I would build my fitness faster that way. Bevan had a different approach. He pointed out that whenever I get injured in the past, it is from the combination of both longer runs plus interval training which places too much stress on my body. Hmm… good point. He predicted that, if I were to include intensity along with duration in my build up, I would break down at roughly 4-6 weeks in, leaving me in a spectator role come race day, as it has in the past. Needless to say, that put the kibosh on my grandiose plans of the interval/long run double that is the mainstay of any running programme. Instead, he suggested that I needed to focus on frequency. Just run. Everyday. The length of the runs varied from 25 minutes to 2h, and while I would lift the pace on some runs, there were no set tempo sessions, hill repeats or one kilometre intervals. It was just running. Part of me loved it – telling a runner that they can run everyday is like letting a sugar addict loose in a candy store. In addition to that, while I LOVE running, I actually really don’t like running those 2 1/2 – 3h runs which are another mainstay of a running programme. They to me are almost the necessary evil of marathon build-ups that sap your reserves, leave you feeling broken and ancient for the rest of the day, but at the same time almost perversely thrilled that you’ve ticked off the big miles that distinguish you from that half marathoner runner.**   A big part of me though was anxious that this preparation would leave me short on race day. How was I supposed to get around 42.2km when I hadn’t run for longer than 2h on any long run?

But I listened dutifully to what Bevan told me, switching it up a bit with my pace – some days it was closer to 6 min kilometer pace, something I would never have considered doing in the past but had become almost worryingly easy to do now. Others we would run a steady 20 minutes at around 4.40 kilometer pace as part of our long run. But, bar one run that was around 2.04 and in hideous weather at a hideously slow pace, I never went beyond those guidelines. I got up every morning and ran, once a week was 2h, once a week was 80 min and the rest were between 25-60 minutes – and, as Bevan said, I made it to the start line in one piece. And while I still wasn’t convinced that I had run long enough in any long run to get through the event and feel okay, you know what? I did. Other than that inevitable dip that occurs in ‘no mans land’ from around 27-32 kilometers, I felt comfortable, strong, I paced it pretty well (the second half was four minutes quicker than the first) and came in at 3.28 and some change. It’s not my fastest – actually it’s slower than my PB by 37 minutes, but I felt awesome. That I made it to the start line and finished in one piece on such a spectacular course are three wins in my book. As a runner, I love to be able to run and I think this approach will allow me to do that. This has provided me with the ‘proof’ I need that I don’t need to do the extra long training runs to successfully complete (and run pretty well) in an event. This is a massive shift from days of old, and the runner mentality. My goal in running these days isn’t to aim for another PB; I don’t have the mental energy required to do that, nor do I want to. I just want to be able to run, enjoy it, participate, push myself and enjoy the afterglow of a run well run. Who knew that you didn’t need to run hard and long to do that? This might not be a major for another runner – but for me it is almost as much of a mind shift as the LCHF approach to marathon training. Stoked to have made it.

PS The guy in the tutu totally took me out – so did another very talented woman runner in a Lululemon running skirt. At the risk of making myself wildly unpopular, I am not a fan of the ruffled skirt number.

*aka any runner because as a group we are known for being frugal – though anyone who runs will testify that it ISN’T a cheap sport

** no disrespect intended. I love half marathoner runners. In fact some of my best friends are half marathoners. 

Type 1 diabetes, endurance sport and the LCHF approach: Lewis’ marathon experience

Following on from Lewis’ post last week about life with type 1 diabetes and following a low carbohydrate high (healthy*) fat (LCHF) diet, here is a race report from the Auckland marathon:

I did my very first marathon (Auckland marathon) two weeks ago. As a reminder, I have type 1 diabetes, eating strictly LCHF for over a year. This is not a race report of the marathon, so much, but rather a detailed analysis of my blood sugar levels from before the gun went off to when I crossed the finish line.  I wear a Dexcom G4 Continual Glucose Monitor. I inject the sensor and carry a receiver with me. It gives me minute-by-minute live blood sugar readings, which I have downloaded for you. As a diabetic, my body is unable to regulate my sugar levels. If my sugar level is good, then the session is good.

The marathon itself, as my first, surprised me by how hard it was. Everyone says 30km gets tough but you have to really experience it to believe it. I could not believe how incredibly tough it was to keep going in the last 10km. My body was fine, but my brain was mush. I was trying to finish at 4hrs, and was on that pace until 30km, but then ended at 4:17. Definitely room to improve for next year. More physical training and certainly more mental toughness will help me last to the final 200 metres.

My sugar levels and my energy levels were excellent.

Interestingly, I tested my blood ketones (to test how “deep” in ketosis I am) before and after the race too, just to see what was going on. At the start, 05:30, my blood ketones were 0.5 mmol/L. This is pretty average for me. I really battle to get higher levels of ketones than that. After the race (11:00), my ketones were 1.5 mmol/l. This illustrated to me that my body is able to access fat burning when it needs it.

I have graphed it and the link below gives a good visual – however I’ve also provided it in detail below.

lewism

Background:

  1. Target range for blood sugar level is between 4mmol/l and 7mmol/l.
  2. During training/race, it is risky to have the sugar levels too low and if they drop below 4 mmol/l, then that causes all sorts of problems. At around 3mmol/l, you get reduced effort, an inability to push yourself, lethargy, and as it gets lower, I run the risk of passing out.
  3. Equally difficult for people with type 1 diabetes is the risk of the sugar level going too high. It is commonly understood that exercise reduces blood sugar level, but only if your blood sugar is below approximately 13mmol/l. Any higher than that, then exercise triggers a response that will increase the blood sugar level further. High blood sugars are extremely uncomfortable (not to mention dangerous), and exercise is not really possible.
  4. So during a race, my target range moves from between 4 – 7mmol/l to between 6 – 9mmol/l.

Race Day:

  1. Sugar levels were excellent during the night. Trending between 4mmol/l and 6mmol/l.
  2. There is something called the Dawn Effect, which causes everyone’s blood sugars to rise just at dawn. My Dawn Effect kicked off at 4am, and took my sugar (not caused by eating anything) from 4 to 7mmol/l.
  3. Before the race, my sugar level had stabilised. I take a cup of super-salty soup stock (taken from The Art and Science of Low Carb Living), and two coconut fat bombs (basically coconut oil, coconut butter sweetened with stevia). The fat bombs are to get in some good fuel from the coconut (which contain saturated fats) just before exercise – this is something you need to play around with, as everyone has a different tolerance level to coconut oil.
  4. You can see at the start of the race my sugar level then starts to rise again. This is a strange phenomenon that I have noticed. I think it is caused by the tiny amount of carbs in the fat bombs and soup stock, as well as the body utilising the last of the glucose stores in the muscles. This increase in sugar never lasts long. You can see here that it increased from 6am to 6:20am. The sugar level was taken from a stable 7mmo/l up to 10mmol/l.
  5. Then it becomes a waiting game. I take zero carbs, and wait for my sugar levels to drop. I know they will. It usually takes over an hour. I check my Continuos Glucose Monitor all the time. Blood sugar stays stable at around 9-10mmol/l for 90 minutes.
  6. Then, over the course of the next 60 minutes, my sugar level slowly descends from around 9mmol/l to 5mmol/l.
  7. I don’t let it drop below 5mmol/l, and therefore I take my glucose supplements that I carry with me. I use Dextro Tabs, where each tab is approximately 3g of carb. I end up taking 10 tablets as I am feeling my sugar levels dropping further. So I take a total of 30g carb around the 2:30 hour mark.
  8. You can see over the next 20 mins that my blood sugar levels stabilise and then drop again. At this point, I am feeling very poor on the marathon. I am not thinking clearly, and just trying to survive.
  9. Instead of taking more Dextro Tabs, I elect to take some coke at the water stations. I take a small serving of coke (100ml) at each of the last 3 water stations. This is a total of 300ml of coke or a further 30g of carbs.
  10. You can see what this extra boost of carbs did for my sugar level in the last 30 mins of the race.
  11. Immediately after the race, my sugar levels stabilised at 9mmol/l.
  12. About half an hour after the race, my sugar level started to increase again. I think this is a result of taking coke too close to the end of the race, and not having enough exercise to burn it up. I should have stopped drinking coke about 30 mins before the end.
  13. I corrected this high blood sugar by taking insulin, and then I treated myself to a binge meal (and beer – I did just complete a marathon after all 🙂 ) and that caused the last spike in sugar around 12:30pm.

So there you have it. 4 hours massive effort on 60g carb, and the 60g ended up being probably about 10g too much.

Comparatively speaking, 1 Gu gel is 22g of carb.

LCHF is the answer!

 *Dietitian and colleague Caryn Zinn aptly changed the acronym. It works.

Not tonight, honey. I’m exhausted.

Have you heard the term ‘ironman widow’? Where someone’s husband (or wife) is basically invisible for the better part of 12 weeks as they prepare for an upcoming race. This not only relates to being physically present (which is diminished when the training time is upwards of 15-20h a week) but also ‘present’ when at home. Often exhaustion sets in, particularly nearer the end of the week or after a heavy training day, where the mere thought of moving from the couch is akin to another 6h ride. Sex? Don’t even go there. It’s a fairly common (yet usually unspoken) phenomenon that rolling around in the sack is off the agenda in the lead up to the event. And I’m not talking about the day before an event; it’s more like as a general rule because they are too damn tired. Does this sound familiar? Yes, being tired is a natural (and expected) part of the training cycle – however, much as we talk about adrenal fatigue and hormonal imbalance in women – this is not an uncommon occurrence in men. It’s just not often talked about.

When we talk hormones, I know that I’m guilty of just addressing women. You know – the stress hormones, thyroid hormones and sex hormones. However men are not exempt from the debilitating effects of overdoing it. Just as a ‘rushed’ lifestyle can affect the thyroid and sex hormones in women (including testosterone), men who undertake endurance sport are at risk of poor testosterone status.

Testosterone: a sex hormone (also present in women too) is a chemical messenger. It declines as we age, and some studies have found a that testosterone levels for a male in their late 30s are down by as much as 50 % on the levels that were present in their 20s. Just as oestrogen is controlled by the hypothalamus, it is the same for testosterone; when the hypothalamus detects a deficiency of testosterone in the blood, it secretes a hormone called gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GRH). This is detected by the pituitary gland that in response starts producing follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). These travel to the testes where testosterone is produced from cholesterol by the leydig cells with just a small amount produced by the adrenal glands. It’s then sent back into the blood stream and either attaches to sex hormone binding protein (SHBG) and becomes biologically inert, or remains free in the bloodstream.  Normal levels are between 300 ng/dl – 1200 ng/dl (10.41)-41.64 ng/dL. The three types of testosterone you might see reported are:

  • Total testosterone- As the name implies, it’s how much testosterone available and is the sum of free and bound testosterone.
  • Free testosterone is the most biologically active form of testosterone. Free but low biologically active test and therefore still have signs/symptoms of overall low testosterone.
  • Bound testosterone-This is the testosterone bound to the protein Sex Hormone Binding Protein (or Globulin) (SHBP/SHBG). A high amount of SHBG will usually indicate a low free testosterone.

Testosterone is not just important for reproduction and sex drive – it has a number of other roles including supporting bone mass, regulating fat distribution, muscle size and strength and red blood cell production. If you are a typical endurance athlete who tends to push themselves and have had stress fractures that can’t be put down to a lack of calcium, it could well be that low testosterone is a contributing factor. As we know, testosterone increases during training and contributes to overall energy levels; a low production of testosterone contributes to the fatigue that can be felt under a heavy training load, making someone feel worse than they should. It’s difficult though, to know what is a normal byproduct of a heavy training load (because, let’s face it, endurance sport requires longer and harder training than, say, golf). Below are some common signs and symptoms of low testosterone.

  • Decreased/absent early morning erection
  • Reduced sex drive
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Loss of facial or pubic hair
  • Testicular atrophy
  • Low bone mineral density/fractures
  • Night sweats

Phew! That’s not you? Well, you may not be out of the woods just yet. Less specific (or earlier signs) include:

  • Decreased energy or motivation
  • Poor concentration and memory
  • Disrupted sleeping patterns
  • Moody
  • Reduce muscle/increased fat mass
  • Reduced performance

You can see that the early signs of a reduced testosterone level could be summed up by being a bit ‘tired’ and are fairly non-specific. The best way to know what is going on with your testosterone is to get it tested through your doctor (noting that the free testosterone is the important measure).

Thankfully there is plenty you can do with your diet to ensure you’re optimising your ability to produce testosterone without getting a prescription for the pharmaceutical type. Unsurprisingly, these come down to pretty much what I write about on a weekly basis:

  • Ensure adequate vitamin D – this is involved in the production of the corticosteroid hormones and it’s important we have enough available to support the production of our thyroid, stress and sex hormones. Food sources are full fat dairy products, a small amount in butter, liver, animal protein and fatty fish such as salmon, sardines and mackerel. Taking a supplement (that also contains vitamin K2) is warranted for a large part of the year in New Zealand, but particularly as we come out of winter and into spring, where the UVB rays are diminished and we’ve been spending the vast majority of time inside on the windtrainer to dodge the weather.
  • Ensure adequate zinc intake (through oysters and animal protein, and brazil nuts too) – a note here is that iron can reduce our overall ability to absorb zinc, and this may need to be looked at if you’re taking an iron supplement.
  • Ensure adequate selenium intake (seafood, Brazil nuts) and vitamin A (full fat dairy products, liver, eggs, animal protein)
  • Saturated and monounsaturated fat: Again, most of the foods mentioned above are good sources of saturated fat in the diet, and monounsaturated fat is found predominantly in olive oil, eggs, avocado and raw nuts. The reality is, all fats contain the range of fatty acids we need, and are labelled ‘saturated’ or ‘monounsaturated’ fats due largely to the amount they contain. Coconut oil (which has had some bad press of late, despite a lack of evidence of a relationship to heart disease) is particularly rich in saturated fat.
  • Cholesterol: another important co-factor in the creation of the sex hormones, and forms the backbone of these. Foods of animal origin help supply dietary cholesterol for this role. If you’re someone who has followed a low fat diet or vegetarian diet and has a low cholesterol level, then potentially your testosterone could be lower than ideal.
  • Ensure adequate B vitamins and magnesium also (present in the foods mentioned above and in abundance in vegetables).

Finally – on the life side of things: sleep more, ensure adequate recovery from training and have more sex. That will increase your testosterone.

Gallstones and your gall bladder 101: what, why, who (and generally speaking) what to do?

Until this week I had no idea how prevalent gall bladder inflammation (cholecystitis) and gallstones were. And in who. A lovely client of mine had experienced cholecystitis for years. She was actually none the wiser as equally suffered from irritable bowel syndrome too so had lumped the symptoms (upper abdominal pain, particularly after a fatty meal) into the same category as ‘digestive issues’ which we had been working on (and she had been having success with) over the last few months. It wasn’t until this week that she called me to say she was diagnosed with gallstones and was going in for emergency surgery to remove it that I thought – hmm, is that unusual? Turns out it’s not.

The gall bladder is required to store the bile that is required for fat digestion. If a person is experiencing inflammation (systemic or local) this can irritate the gallbladder and cause significant abdominal pain after eating which usually subsides in the hours that follow. Gallstones are a result of reduced gallbladder function, where the bile isn’t released as it should be and can become thick and sticky, forming stones that can be the size of pebbles to the size of golf balls. There are three types of stones; black pigment stones (related to cirrhosis – scar tissue build up in the liver – or haemolytic disorders – breakdown of red blood cells); brown pigment stones (related to an infection in the gall bladder) but overwhelmingly in the western world, the prevalence of the third type of stone – a cholesterol rich one – is increasing, accounting for around 70% of gallstones. Pain occurs if one of these get stuck in the bile duct – this may also subside. However if you experience continual pain, or begin to have more frequent attacks, then it is generally recommended that something needs to be done.

I had always associated gallstones with people of an older age bracket, but that was just because I’d never had a reason to look into it at all. In fact, this week I was bombarded by young, fit women who responded to a post I put on my Facebook page related to cholecystitis and gallstones that had all experienced problems and subsequently had their gallbladders removed. Now not all people suffering from cholecystitis have gallstones, and not everybody with gallstones experience pain – indeed some remain asymptomatic for most of the time. However, there is a surprisingly high number of people that experience problems with either condition and in New Zealand it’s estimated that 20% of people aged 30y – 75y will be affected. Now that is a LOT of people who may be having problems with either cholecystitis or gallstones and potentially not even know it. The pain experienced in an attack may be in isolation of other symptoms, or put down to ‘normal digestive issues’.

The formation of gallstones and cholecystitis is (like most things) possibly due to an interaction between both genetic and environmental factors. Genetically, a mutation in a protein that may be responsible for the delivery of phospholipids and bile from the liver will increase the risk, as will having a genetic predisposition – the latter increasing your risk four-fold. In addition – and this is what sparked my attention from the Facebook posts – the presence of an autoimmune disorder (Crohns disease, celiac disease) or even a sensitivity to gluten increases risk. The first possible reason for this could be from increased inflammation due to the nutrient malabsorption, or a defect in the gallbladder ability to empty – both resulting in a reduction in gallbladder function. Alternatively, it could be that the gallbladder disease is the result of the same immune system attacks that occur with an autoimmune condition. Regardless of the mechanism, there is a very real relationship here.

Other factors that increase the risk of gallstones are taking an oral contraceptive pill, being pregnant, or having had multiple pregnancies. The increased oestrogen levels affect gallbladder motility (delaying bile release from the gallbladder) and increase cholesterol saturation of bile (cholesterol is the backbone of our sex hormones). A high carbohydrate intake in pregnant women (particularly fructose) is also associated with increased incidence, and there is a link between pregnancy, pancreatitis and gallstone risk. Weight loss, weight cycling or fasting can also increase risk of gallstones as fat is being rapidly broken down and there is increased secretion of cholesterol into bile. With these factors in mind, it is no wonder women are at greater risk (two-thirds of those in the US with gallbladder disease are women). Equally a diet that is higher in processed refined food and calories increases the risk with higher circulating insulin and triglycerides as a consequence of the standard western diet. People who are overweight or obese, or have risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome are at an increased risk – now this may well be due to the previous point, however this has also been found independent of diet; those with a fat deposition around the middle are more likely to experience problems. Indeed this type of fat patterning is related to reduced function of the liver (and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) which may result in fat build up and cirrhosis also related to gallbladder function.

A question that arose on my Facebook page was whether athletes were at greater risk compared to the general population.I had a good look around the literature and only came across a couple of studies that related a high training load to problems with the gallbladder. As athletes we place ourselves under a lot of training stress – chronically this leads to increased inflammation. Haemolysis can also occur in susceptible athletes who heavily exert themselves which again impacts on inflammatory pathways. This inflammation is in the absence of gallstones but may well lead to gallstone formation as it reduces gallbladder function. If you combine this with an intolerance to certain food (as a number of endurance athletes also experience), then there are certainly links between the two despite an absence of academic literature out there. Changes to liver enzymes after an extreme endurance event may place an athlete at risk, and interestingly, this case study illustrated how inflammation due to higher intensity training led to a thickening of the gallbladder tissue and an increased tension in the absence of stones or bile buildup (‘sludge’). The removal of the gallbladder stopped this tension and the athlete was pain-free. In this instance, surgery was potentially the only route as it wasn’t related to stones. But if you do suffer from gallbladder problems with or without gallstones and don’t want to go down the surgical route, what are your other options?

For those with problematic gallstones, a first approach may be sound wave therapy to break down stones so they can move down the intestine and be excreted without the risk of getting stuck. Similarly, ingesting a naturally occurring bile (in the form of ursodeoxycholic acid) may also gradually break down the stones. However many people continue to suffer symptoms associated with gallstone attacks after these treatments. Though not in the academic/medical literature, I’ve read a lot of people do an olive oil/lemon juice protocol which (it appears) involves fasting/apple juice/anywhere from 1 cup to 3 cups olive oil and lemon juice/sleeping then warm water. I’ve actually just lumped a lot of different components of these protocols to give you an idea of what you can find if you can go searching… not to recommend you try it (it’s not my place to do that!)

For those with problems related to inflammation of the gallbladder, or with gallstones that are symptomatic, an anti-inflammatory diet is the way to go – removal of grains, dairy, legumes, refined processed food and a focus on fruits, vegetables and animal protein. These foods are rich sources of antioxidants and are not going to cause stress on the digestive system, thereby they are your best line of defense. For some, following an auto-immune protocol that also removes eggs, nightshade vegetables, nuts and seeds initially may be required, with further supplementation to help heal the gut. If you have neither of the above and are currently losing weight, research suggests that following a higher fat diet for weight loss is protective against developing gallstones when compared to a lower fat diet. Further, there is limited research that vitamin C supplementation can prevent gallstones by promoting the conversion of cholesterol to bile salts in the gall bladder.

And what if you have the surgery to remove your gallbladder? Is it low fat foods from here on in? This seems to vary a LOT from person to person. Some people can continue to include good amounts of healthy fat in their diet with no noticeable digestive issues. While some notice a vast improvement with the addition of digestive enzymes, others don’t notice any change. It’s best not to drink fluid around meals so you don’t dilute your stomach acid and obviously try to eat as ‘clean’ as possible –following a paleo approach will ensure nutrient intake is optimal.

Antioxidant use and the athlete: should you or shouldn’t you?

There is nothing more disappointing than doing everything you possibly can to prepare for an event… and then the week before you wake up with a scratchy throat. Panic sets in. WTF?! You’ve been diligent about rugging up before heading out for your training. You’ve gotten extremely adept at opening the fridge in your staffroom with your elbow, and the unexpected benefit of not touching the escalator handrail is that your balance has improved exponentially. All of that, along with religiously popping two of those yummy fizzy orange lollies masquerading as vitamin C tablets daily to fight those pesky free radicals that your body is subjected to week in, week out as part of your normal training load. Yet this feels like the beginning of a worrying week pre-race that could derail what was looking like a PB race.

The problem with being an athlete is that you’re constantly teetering on the edge of becoming sick – when you add training on top of an already busy life load, you run the risk of becoming run down and, for some, chronically so. It must be said, though, that athletes are often the least likely to come down with the winter ills. Regular training affords us positive adaptations in cardiovascular, skeletal muscle and respiratory systems, which benefit both everyday wellbeing and prevent against metabolic diseases.  However, despite the undeniable health benefits, exercise increases the production of free radicals in your body, and in excess these may promote increased oxidative stress and damage in the DNA structure. This leads to impaired skeletal tissue function and increased muscle pain, affecting our ability to train and thus perform. Not to mention looking about 81 years old when you’re barely 50. Hmm… there are definite downsides to training. In order to combat this, many athletes and sports professionals have a regular regime of antioxidant supplements (such as vitamin C) they take daily as part of their overall training strategy.

While there can be benefits with taking additional supplements, there are questions around the usefulness of these for athletes. Recently it’s been established that, contrary to strengthening our resilience against illness, we may be doing ourselves a disservice, as physical activity itself causes adaptations in the tissue and increases the expression of receptors that are responsible for producing our internal antioxidant defenses. This stress is important to help us become stronger for the next session, and thus become fitter (termed mitohormesis.)  A recent study investigating this concept also found that regardless of training status, supplementing with antioxidants blunted the ability of exercise to increase insulin sensitivity, and the release of adinopectin, a hormone with a role in blood glucose regulation and fatty acid oxidation.

Does this mean, then, that you should throw away your vitamin C tablets? Actually – to my mind, no. There is a time and place for additional antioxidant supplementation and a blanket approach, taken as an insurance to ward off ills is not the answer. In the literature, there are questions around the use of antioxidants and, like a lot of scientific trials involving humans, this stems from methodological differences, alongside individual differences which garner different results. Many studies didn’t control for overall diet, the training status of the participants differed, along with the definition of ‘endurance’ – I know that many people would view a definition of ‘training 4-5 x per week for up to 60 minutes at a time’ does not an endurance athlete make. The active ingredient in the supplement along with the way it is formulated can also affect the absorption and thus its effectiveness.

There are times in your training cycle where it’s beneficial to expose your body to the adaptive effects of training – as you’re building up your base your body is undergoing many of these, learning to go longer, lift heavier, potentially go faster. This is not the time to take the supplement, as your main goal is to become a better athlete through these changes. In the lead up to the race, however, the adaptive phase is done. Your main concern is getting to the start line in as good a condition as possible. Consider taking a supplement in the week leading up to the event to protect your antioixidant status (which will undoubtedly give you a psychological boost). In addition, it appears that particularly after an event, antioxidant status is reduced (which makes sense, given the stress that racing places on the body) and ensuring a nutrient rich diet with additional supplementation makes sense in the few days afterwards. There are no guidelines around dosage in the literature, but a supplement in a chelated form (along with an amino acid, perhaps powdered form) will help absorption of a vitamin C supplement.

Of course, throughout your normal diet, however, there is much more benefit to take on board these nutrients in their natural state. Vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals that work as antioxidants in the body work in a synergy that can’t be emulated by a pill. While there is increasing interest in the use of ‘functional foods’ such as gogi berries, black tart cherry juice, beetroot juice and the like, your antioxidant status is enhanced through consuming an abundance of nutrient-dense foods that provide this synergy, and there are plenty of studies to show this.

In addition to the numerous vegetable and fruit sources of these constituents, animal based foods are more nutrient dense with regards to cofactors responsible for decreasing oxidative stress in the body. Free range eggs, naturally occurring fats, fish, meat, all contribute either antioxidants themselves (such as co-enzyme q 10 and glycine) or provide the proteins necessary to build our body’s own antioxidant defense. It goes without saying that removing seed oils and processed foods which contribute to the omega-6 load of our diet (thus promoting inflammation) is an important factor here.

Of course, as an athlete, diet is just one factor that contributes to your ability to fight off infection. If you’re not getting adequate sleep, ensuring your training sessions include enough recovery to enable your body to adapt to the training stress, and allowing some downtime in every day life outside of training to just relax, then your risk of coming down with a cold or flu at this time of year will exponentially increase. That said and done, if you do feel the beginnings of a scratchy throat? One of the best things you can do is take a tonic. Check out this below that Chris Kresser talked about. Sounds potent, but it does the trick for him. Many people swear by ginger, manuka honey and lemon to help ward off colds, and ginger is well known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as is manuka honey.

(over to Chris for the last word…)

“Juice 1 kg pf ginger in a juicer. And then you put 3 to 4 tablespoons of ginger in a cup with the juice of one lemon and some honey, like a couple of teaspoons or a tablespoon of honey, and you sip on that all day.  You’ll probably need to make it a couple more times throughout the day, but you just keep sipping it throughout the whole day.  It’s really intense, that much fresh ginger juice.  You’ll really understand when people say that ginger is spicy when you drink that!  You sprinkle a tiny bit of cayenne pepper, like a pinch of it, too.  That really helps a lot.  The fresh ginger is antiviral, and it actually prevents the adhesion of the virus to the upper respiratory mucosa.  If you do it right at the beginning of getting sick, it can really prevent you from getting sick at all. Taken 3-5 times a day. That’s enough for two people over 1.5 days, might make 2-3 batches.”

 

So… have you gone all keto?

Yes. But unlike my decision to ‘go paleo’ this was a predetermined, calculated, conscious decision and not ‘by default’, which is how my whole food philosophy came about. And that’s largely because it would be very difficult to just ‘go keto’ without some predetermined, calculated, conscious decision making occurring. Although, with the wisdom that is obviously gained from now 9 days of carbohydrate and protein restriction, and the consumption of vastly increased grams of fat I am pretty sure a lot of people out there who believe they are ketogenic might not be – if the websites devoted to keto foods and recipes are anything to go by. How on earth would they be in ketosis with protein portions that large??

Now why would I bother jumping on the keto bandwagon? A few reasons. A lot of people I know have tried it and I’ve reached a point where I’m curious enough to see if I had the discipline to follow such a strict dietary regime (regime is a rather harsh word, but I feel it’s applicable for this diet). Whilst some people observe what I eat and exclaim how ‘disciplined’ I am (like it’s a virtue), I love what I eat and eat what I want – eating a real food diet isn’t about discipline, it’s about pleasure. The strict limits on not only carbohydrate but protein requires discipline largely reserved for the very analytical and uber intelligent (i.e. Peter Attia over at Eating Academy).

The second reason is self experimentation – a far cry from the days I mocked people for using the term n=1, I now wanted to experience, document and reflect on how it feels to undertake a ketogenic diet. A great way to learn and understand anything is to experience it. My weight and body image issues growing up, for example, have provided me with better insight into the challenges faced by clients who battle with similar problems, despite the fact that, physically, we may look very different. As a number of my clients now have heard of a ketogenic diet and just want to try it, or have legitimate health reasons that warrant a ketogenic approach as a tool to improve metabolic health markers, then to be able to speak from experience is obviously advantageous.

The final reason is because Caryn gave it a go. And therefore, out of those left in our research team at Human Potential Centre who had yet to follow a ketogenic diet, I was the only person left who had yet to try it. Other than Scott. And as he is still drinking energy drinks (albeit he’s switched to the sugar free variety, and swigs water after having it to protect his teeth), it’s fair to say our respective diets are poles apart at this point. However he has recently jumped on the Twitter bandwagon so I’m sure it won’t be too long before he’s swigging bottles of MCT oil and professing the benefits of butter like it’s nobody’s business. However, I am a nutritionist and, as the last one standing I felt not a small amount of FOMO by having not at least tried it. I’m actually in the best position out of my colleagues – as I can learn from their mistakes. Like I did at St Johns. As a cadet in my younger years we had regional competitions that required assessing a medical emergency and stitching or bandaging people up with the one who illustrated the most knowledge walking away with the trophy. As my last name is Williden I was usually last to front up, and my St John’s group would filter information to me so, by the time it was my turn, I was armed with all necessary information to go into the medical situation and assess, inform, and bandage with skills that would make me an indispensable member of McDreamy’s team. This ketogenic diet experiment is not dissimilar, minus the trophy and the badge to stitch on my jersey.

So Day 9… A short time, sure. But I’ve learned a few things already.

  1. It’s hard to stick to the protein limit. Really hard. I got an inkling of that when I read Tim Noakes’ Real Meal Revolution recommendation of keeping animal protein to 80g per meal absolute amounts. But who also knew vegetables contained so much protein?
  2. That it is hard to get the amount of fat necessary for ketosis and overeat. My food volume has dramatically reduced. Obviously, though, if you do eat more fat than you need, this will be reflected in weight gain/gastrointestinal problems etc over the long term.
  3. That I’d wildly underestimated the amount of peanut/almond/coconut butter I actually ate in normal life (like somehow the Gilmours 3kg bags of nuts just disappeared of their own accord). I’ve never tracked my food to this extent (using Easy Diet Diary app for iPhone) and it is a real eye opener.
  4. That not all food apps are created equal. For example, Fitday lists broccoli has having almost as much carbohydrate as pumpkin. It doesn’t.
  5. That for some people to get into ketosis, 50g of carbohydrate (CHO) might be too high, and closer to 30g is better. Is this a female thing? Maybe. This is clearly insight from Caryn who passed this on. While the academic literature often places limits of 20-30g CHO/day,  there are also studies that refer to a low carbohydrate, high protein diet as ‘ketogenic.’ Confusion is clearly not limited to the bloggersphere.
  6. There is a lot of misinformation on the Internet about ketogenic diets. But there are some very smart people writing about this – way smarter and knowledgeable than I am.
  7. People are unnecessarily verbose in recipes and post too many ‘stages’ pictures.
  8. That, despite being my dislike of Thai food and Thai restaurants, I really like my own Thai red curry coconut chicken. (I must be the only person who doesn’t like Thai food. I know. Is it the cheesy American cover songs and proliferation of sweet chilli sauce? Maybe).
  9. That making pastry is way easier than I ever realized.
  10. That if you decide to make pastry to turn that chicken curry into a pie, you should probably check that you own a rolling pin (or a good substitute) first
  11. That I make really good rhubarb crumble and chicken curry pie. These and other recipes are over on my Facebook nutrition page – definitely check them out.

Other thoughts:

  1. Training wise – I’ve felt great. Up until Friday and then it felt like I’d been turned upside down and emptied out. Hardest. Run. Ever. Barely breaking 5.30 k’s (actually that’s an estimate – thankfully Nicky’s evil Garmin wasn’t working and I was too scared to wear mine). Friday and Saturday were complete write offs but today’s run – storming. Seriously. Even after doing weights yesterday I woke up feeling better than I have in a long time.
  2. During normal day: I’ve felt flat. A bit sick on some days too – and particularly on the days when I missed having a coffee with cream, or something similar, which reduces amount of fat I start the day with. But, again, today I feel back to being awesome.
  3. Twice during the week I woke up and couldn’t get back to sleep for an hour. Unusual for me, though not unheard of. Last night I slept right through. This may be due to the diet, might have nothing to do with it.
  4. I miss fruit. And dates. And wine (for now – I’m abstaining for now, given that alcohol is preferentially metabolized in the body – which would largely offset my efforts to turn fat into the go-to fuel tank).
  5. While I, like many people, have my go-to foods, nine days into this and I’ve needed a bit of variety to keep me focused. I typically eat a TON of vegetables, and would feel largely dissatisfied to sit down to a third of that with extra dressing added as a fat source.
  6. It’s a shame that I’m making all these awesome meals and I have yet to meet my future husband. He is seriously missing out on some good eats.

I know. I’m late to the party on this. Just like the paleo/real food/whole food movement, I’m pontificating on something that some of you reading this would have read about, adopted, wrote about, reflected on and then moved on five years ago. If this is you, and you have some wise words then please share! This is a learning curve for me (and clients) so the more I know the better.

So I’m hoping for that ‘keto’ clarity, that ethereal experience people talk about, and that today’s run was indicative of the amazing training that I will experience as I undergo this keto experiment. (It goes without saying that this will of course turn me into an amazing athlete lol) I’m also hoping that my experience will add to the information out there that seems, for the most part, from the male experience. There are a few women writing about it, but it is largely a male dominated space. I will keep you updated, both here and on my Facebook page. Right. Off to make keto hot cross buns. Because nothing says Easter like almond flour buns dressed with a white cross.