Constant cravings? Here’s 18 evidence-backed (or anecdotal) tips that will curb them.

Are you back into the swing of things but your taste buds aren’t?  It happens! Especially around this time of year where intake of sugar, alcohol and processed carbohydrates tends to be higher for most people, and while going cold turkey can be the best move, it’s sometimes easier said than done. The good news is that by reducing these foods, you’ll begin to lose the taste for them, and they’ll no longer hold the appeal that they had. For some though, completely removing them is a better idea – even small amounts can continue to drive the appetite for them. Regardless of which camp you fall into, here are some proven, some anecdotal, and some interesting ways to combat those cravings.

  1. The basics: build your plate based around protein and fibre, with fat for satiety. Protein is well known to be the most satisfying nutrient, and along with fibre (also key for adding bulk and feeling full) will keep most people satisfied longer than either carbohydrate or fat. Any starchy or carbohydrate-based foods are best if they are minimally processed (such as potatoes, kumara, legumes, fruit) as these will provide more nutrient bang for your buck). How much of each? Protein-type foods (meat, fish, eggs, poultry) aim for 1-2 palm-sized portions. Starchy carbs (if included) at around a fist-sized amount.  Fat? 1-2 thumb-sized amounts, depending on the type of protein portion you’re eating: a fattier cut might be satisfying enough, however a lean chicken breast will likely require some added fat to help satisfy you. And vegetables? Go for gold – other than the starchier varieties (mentioned above) you could fill your boots with these. For some people, having a full plate is essential to feeling satisfied and if you can do that by adding more volume, it is going to have a positive effect on the satiety from a meal (that’s definitely me). For some ideas, check out my recipe e-book or my online coaching service.
  2. Get rid of anything that is ‘your poison’- if you are the person that hears the icecream calling you from the freezer, it is much better off out of the house. Out of sight, out of mind.
  3. Put all the ‘treat’ type food in one place in your house, preferably above eye level. This will save you seeing the Christmas cake when you are grabbing the eggs, and the chocolate almonds when you are searching for the bottle of olive oil. Constant reminders of all the things you are trying not to eat will NOT help your cause.
  4. Chew your food properly at each meal. Aim for 30 times per mouthful. That way you’ll digest your nutrients effectively, feel more nourished and less likely to be hungry an hour after eating because you wolfed that meal down.
  5. Do not substitute those refined sugars for ‘natural’ sugars. That dried fruit is pretty much just sugar – and (a few nutrients and fibre aside) no better than sugar and will continue to drive your sugar cravings. You shouldn’t rely on dried fruit (or any sweet food that is marketed as ‘refined sugar free’) as a substantial nutrient source . Any additional fibre or nutrients they provide in the diet is negligible compared to the whack of goodness you’ll get when you follow #1 above. When health bloggers or food producers market something based on the healthfulness of the ‘natural’ sugar, it is pure embellishment. 6 meedjol dates and a banana does not make a smoothie sugar free.
  6. Coconut oil – this is a favourite of Sarah Wilson’s: a teaspoon of extra virgin coconut oil can kill a craving in its tracks. If we head to the literature to find any peer reviewed papers on the topic (for what it’s worth, there is a LOT of research published by the Coconut Research Center), there isn’t a lot to definitively tell us that it will cut cravings. That said, there is some research has found that people who include more coconut oil in their diet (compared to other types of fat) have reduced food intake overall, particularly in the subsequent meals. Like most things, you have nothing to lose by trying it.
  7. Cocoa – chocolate is long associated with cravings, though right now, consumption of chocolate may well increase the cravings rather than stamp them out. It’s also not exactly useful if you’re trying to focus on reducing your intake of junk food! That said, chocolate is known for its cognitive and mood enhancing benefits. So how about some unsweetened cocoa (or cacao) in hot water with some milk to deliver the chocolate taste you are after. Add a touch of stevia if you wish. You could also do this cold with almond milk and ice – and add 1 tablespoon of psyllium husk or gelatin in there for some additional fibre or protein. If chocolate is what you’re after – go for the darkest that you can stand. Many people find they stop at 1-2 pieces of 90% chocolate instead of the 1-2 rows consumed of the 70%.
  8. Anything that lowers your blood sugar response to a meal is going to positively impact your cravings. The steep rise and fall of your blood sugar in response to a meal causes alarm bells to start going off in your brain. The body runs a tight ship and prefers when all systems are in homeostasis. Low blood sugar causes a release in stress hormones which tell your liver to dump glucose into the bloodstream, and create cravings so you can re-establish blood sugar to within a normal range. Including cinnamon can reduces glucose response after a meal (in amounts of 6g) and affects insulin response. Stabilising blood sugar is going to help reduce cravings. Sprinkle this gold dust on your breakfast, with your teaspoon of coconut oil, in your cocoa drink etc.
  9. Glutamine – can enhance secretion of GLP-1, a hormone which promotes insulin release that helps increase satiety and dampen appetite – this is only seen in some people however, suggesting there is individual variation of its effects. The flipside of this is that the insulin-releasing effects may override any satiety benefits, increasing hunger (and subsequent meal size) at the next meal. However, in practice this is a tool that many clinicians (myself included) have found useful for some (but not all) clients. The presence of glutamine in the bloodstream is associated with improved insulin sensitivity in healthy people. In addition to this, glutamine has been found to be beneficial for improving intestinal permeability and tight junction protein expression in the gut, being one of the most abundant amino acids in the body. If your cravings are related to gut dysbiosis then it could be useful from this perspective. In addition, it functions as part of neurotransmitter production. Taking L Glutamine by putting it under the tongue as a craving hits (1-3,000mg) may just work for you.
  10. Magnesium is a nutrient that is involved in over 250 processes in our body, and particularly when we are under stress, it is put under the pump. Sugar (or specifically) chocolate craving is often linked to a deficiency to magnesium, but that isn’t conclusive. At any rate, magnesium is perfectly safe to take, and as our food supply is relatively low in magnesium, looking for a supplement that is a magnesium glycinate, citrate or chelated with amino acids may be useful, at amounts of around 300-400mg elemental magnesium.
  11. Chromium is another supplement that some people have found useful for stopping cravings – research has found a reduction in carbohydrate cravings, food intake and an increase in satiety when supplementing with chromium…however this is in the laboratory using mice. There’s nothing definitive in the research to support using it for people who already have adequate amounts of this mineral. That said (as with anything), it’s individual – I know many clients who swear by using Chromium supplements when a craving hits. The only way to know if it works for you is to try it, by taking 1000mg chromium in two doses in meals that contain carbohydrate (due to its suggested benefits at reducing blood sugar response to carbohydrate meals)..
  12. Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are three amino acids that act as nutrient signallers which may help reduce food intake . Leucine (one of the BCAAs) activates mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) which is required for our brain to respond to leptin (a hormone that tells our body when we have had enough food). BCAAs are involved with hormone release in both the gastrointestinal tract and in fat deposits. BCAAs and dietary protein enhanced glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release and reduced the expression of genes required for synthesis and adsorption of fatty acids in a human intestinal cell line (NCI-H716), suggesting an intestinal mechanism for the beneficial effect of BCAAs. Those that have successfully used BCAAs suggest 5g in the AM and every few hours while you’re adjusting your diet back to baseline awesomeness.
  13. 5htp: 300-500mg taken with a meal to increase satiety of the meal – studies have found a reduced food intake (particularly carbohydrate). Studies conducted have focused on people who have reduced availability of tryptophan in the brain (a precursor to 5htp). Increasing 5htp increases tryptophan and therefore serotonin production, reducing cravings and overall food intake. (Don’t use if you are currently on antidepressants without clearance from your doctor.)
  14. Exercise. A no brainer, really, but research has found this to be super effective for reducing cravings. In fact, any activity done while in the midst of a craving will take your mind off it. So when a craving hits, doing something active for 10-15 minutes can reduce your desire for something sweet. Go for a powerwalk, shoot some hoops, do some hill sprints…
  15. Make sure you’re getting enough sleep! It’s hard this time of year with longer days and opportunities to take advantage of summer (when it shows up…) Sleep restriction enhances activity in brain regions involved in reward in response to energy dense, nutrient-void food (think: lollies, chips, chocolate), suggesting heightened sensitivity to rewarding properties of food. This can lead to increased cravings. If you are burning the candle at both ends and not yet back to your regular 7-8 hours sleep per night, then nailing this will go a long way to helping curb that sugar demon.
  16. Meditation: decentring – viewing your thoughts as separate from yourself – has been found to help reduce food cravings and want for unhealthy food items. Mindfulness practice is also useful for not only reduced cravings, but for reduced emotional eating, body image concerns. It doesn’t require a 90 minute class three times a week (though there’s nothing wrong with that!) Headspace, Calm or Buddhify are three smart phone applications which may help you get going and provide guided sessions of between 2-20 minutes long. It’s consistency and frequency that makes a difference (like any habit).
  17. Clay modelling to reduce cravings: yep. Researchers found that visual imagery plays a key role in reducing craving. Participants who worked for 10 minutes constructing shapes from plastacine had reduced cravings for chocolate compared to people who were left to their own thoughts or who were given a written task.
  18. Your gut bacteria can influence your cravings. There is indirect evidence for a connection between cravings and the type of bacteria lurking in your gut. For example, people who enjoy and crave chocolate have different microbial metabolites (i.e. bacteria by-products) in their urine than “chocolate indifferent” individuals, despite eating identical diets. In addition, gut bacteria can influence the production of our ‘feel good’ and motivation hormones (serotonin and dopamine), thereby influence food decision-making based on our mood. Finally treating mice with a probiotic reduced hunger-inducing hormones and food intake. Action points here? Yes, you could start with a probiotic, particularly when you’re in the thick of it all, as this will help ensure there are beneficial bacterial strains present in your gut. However, for ongoing gut health, the regular addition of probiotic and prebiotics through food will help you maintain a healthy gut microbiome. Therefore:
  • Include fermented vegetables into 1-2 meals daily, working up to 1-2 tablespoons at a time.
  • The addition of unsweetened yoghurt (dairy or coconut) as part of your everyday diet (as it contains beneficial bacteria).
  • Kombucha, at around 100-150ml per day (check the back of the label to ensure a lower sugar variety).
  • Water, milk or coconut kefir, start with around 100ml per day.
  • Raw apple cider vinegar in water – start with 1 tsp in a small amount of water, working up to 1 tablespoon. This will help stimulate stomach acid when taken prior to meals, helping you digest your food properly, and delaying gastric emptying, so your glucose response to the meal will be slower too.
  • Vegetables, in abundance, to include fibres that feed your gut bacteria.

(As a side note, any change to your gut environment can result in unintended (and unwanted) changes to your digestive tract! If you’re new to the fermented foods and/or probiotics, then start small and work your way up. If you end up spending way more time in the bathroom than you wanted, reduce back further. Consider yourself warned.)

You won’t need to do all of these – but I think #1-5, #14, #15, #16 and #18 would completely diminish that sugar demon so you can get back to feeling awesome.

cravings

Grab that cupcake and bin it immediately. Underneath something that will stop you from retrieving it later on. (PC: SamadiMD.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Could your gut health be responsible for your high cholesterol?

You are probably aware if you have been reading my blog for a while and following likeminded people that it’s not as black or white as whether or not your high cholesterol level is a problem. Much as I get a bit on edge when I see plates of food without any colourful vegetables (I’m not going to lie to you!), I get a little bit twitchy when I see it professed everywhere that it’s no longer a problem to have a high cholesterol level. Not true. Now cholesterol is essential to life. Without it, we wouldn’t be able to make hormones, repair cell membranes and do 68 other things that require cholesterol. Your body makes 85% of the cholesterol circulating in your bloodstream even, meaning that, for most people, the cholesterol eaten by way of animal products (animal protein, eggs, cream, butter, cheese) will have very little impact on their overall cholesterol level in the body.

One of the main factors that can cause high cholesterol levels is not the cholesterol that you eat (and you’ll be aware that in New Zealand we’ve not had a recommendation around reducing cholesterol containing foods for a while – though the rumour of the egg just will not die). It’s also not just about the fat that you eat. While scientists were busy trying to prove the diet-heart-hypothesis correct over the last 50 years (you know, the one that has pretty much governed our public health nutrition messages and is still today being pushed by nutrition authorities, despite the failure of aforementioned scientists to do so), the powerhouses of the food industry were busy manufacturing and marketing those low fat, processed, refined carbohydrate-based foods that contribute to an inflammatory state which underpins all chronic disease – including heart disease and high cholesterol levels. That is something I have understood well. However after listening to that brainiac Robb Wolf discuss cholesterol with Dr Rhonda Patrick on a recent podcast about cell metabolism the role that the gut plays in both the inflammatory state and our cholesterol levels which could determine whether or not we should be concerned was touched on. One of these was through increasing insulin resistance (IR; and inflammation) at the local level of the gut, and the other was the inflammation that occurs through gastrointestinal or gut issues which may include this IR, but also any challenge which stimulates an immune response.

We know that IR is caused by high circulating blood sugar levels requiring a constant response from our pancreas to produce the hormone insulin to ferret that glucose to where it’s required (working muscle tissue, our carbohydrate stores, red blood cells and retina, brain and excess converted to triglycerides in the liver). Constant and chronic high blood sugar levels and subsequent insulin release causes the pancreas to work overtime which, over time and in some situations, our body is unable to read appropriately or respond effectively – our cells become immune to the insulin trying to deliver glucose and glucose and insulin hang around our blood system causing glycation of proteins, cell damage, oxidation and inflammation. The IR causes systemic inflammation which further drives insulin resistance, higher blood triglycerides, lower HDL cholesterol and weight gain, specifically central weight gain which creates even more inflammation. A bit of a cascade which, if not managed, leads to type 2 diabetes (one of the major ‘end points’ of insulin resistance, if you like). Further, those with type 2 diabetes tend to have higher cholesterol levels. Well, what if this also starts in the gut?

Dr Rhonda Patrick spoke of a paper she read in Nature* that reported on research that showed chronic over consumption of processed refined carbohydrates can cause epithelial cells of the gut to become insulin resistant and unable to take up the sugar. We get IR in the local level of the digestive tract and this is pushed out to the rest of the tissues because of the inherent systemic features of the inflammation. Meanwhile, the bacterial cells that are present in our gut are getting all of the glucose that they want and thriving*. Because the IR means our gut cells aren’t able to take the glucose up, the goblet cells in our gut (the ones responsible for secreting mucus to protect our gut wall) aren’t getting the substrate required for them to make energy and produce the mucus to protect our gut intestinal lining. Over time, with no energy, the gut barrier will begin to break down.

Now – this is where the quality of the carbohydrate matters. Dense carbohydrates such as potatoes, sweet potatoes and minimally processed grains tend not to be metabolised in the upper portion of the small intestine and tend to provide more fermentable substrate that feeds our gut and supports our gut health (for an excellent paper by Dr Ian Spreadbury – incidentally one of the speakers at the upcoming Ancestral Health Society conference in Queenstown in October, click here). This means that these types of carbohydrate are not going to create the inflammation in the way that those refined grains do – the ones that we base our public health recommendations on (cereal, wholegrain bread, pasta and the like).

So, that inflammatory state that is started locally at the gut level is another mechanism that explains how the state of our gut can determine whether your high cholesterol level could be a problem.

The other one more directly affects the LDL cholesterol circulating the body.

FACT: the gut is the nexus to health – it has the largest concentration of immune cells as it is exposed to the external environment (food). Those immune cells are there to fight off things which are pathogenic.  The gut also it has the highest concentration of bacterial cells, and immune cells and bacteria together are NOT a good thing, particularly when they come into contact – that’s why we have that epithelial barrier that protects the immune cells.  As soon as that barrier breaks down, the immune cells come into contact with the bacteria cells and it’s all on, they start firing off these pro-inflammatory cytokines to kill off the bacteria. This results in the bacteria releasing off endotoxin – which is where some of the problem relating to LDL cholesterol can originate.

Bacteria in the gut have a cell wall called lipopolysaccharide which holds endotoxins –it gets released into the circulation when the bacteria are dying (which is why anyone who is undergoing diet or supplemental changes to change the bacteria in the gut might experience initial discomfort as the bad bacteria die off). This increases production of very low density lipoprotein (and LDL eventually) because these bind endotoxins – they soak it up like a sponge. However, instead of being delivered back to the liver to be recycled it remains in circulation as the endotoxin binds to the LDL receptor on this particle and prevents it from being taken back up by the liver. This will increase the likelihood of the LDL particle being oxidised – a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. You know it’s not about LDL cholesterol or total cholesterol, it is to do (in part) to particle size –the small dense particles have been associated with heart disease.

Now the problem with these LDL particles that have an endotoxin attached is that they are the smaller, denser LDL particles. These particles, already a risk factor for heart disease now have a bacterial signal floating around the blood stream. This causes your immune cells to suddenly be on high alert. The macrophages that come to kill off the bacteria are attacking the LDL and endotoxin and the subsequent action of the immune system starts a cascade of events which over time will lead to the stiffening and narrowing of the artery as it gets stuck there.

Is your head spinning? Tell me about it. And I’m not a brainiac and suspect this could have been explained far more simply by someone far more intelligent than I. However, the main take home from this is that if you are someone that leads a lifestyle which promotes inflammation (high intake of processed carbohydrates and vegetable oils, little to no vegetable fibre, no exercise, lack of sleep, too much exercise, smoking, high consumption of alcohol…) then your high cholesterol reading could be a problem. That, for most people, should by now be a no-brainer.

However, if you are someone who has these factors dialled in and still has a high cholesterol reading, perhaps it wouldn’t hurt to consider the health of your gut.

*try as I might, I couldn’t find this paper. Let me know if you can as I’m interested to read it. Thanks George.

(Not me, though I'm as cute as this dude IMO) - and thanks to http://mrmenoc.wikia.com/wiki/Mr._Brainiac for image.

(Not me, though I’m as cute as this dude IMO) – and thanks to http://mrmenoc.wikia.com/wiki/Mr._Brainiac for image.

Type 1 diabetes, endurance sport and the LCHF approach: Lewis’ marathon experience

Following on from Lewis’ post last week about life with type 1 diabetes and following a low carbohydrate high (healthy*) fat (LCHF) diet, here is a race report from the Auckland marathon:

I did my very first marathon (Auckland marathon) two weeks ago. As a reminder, I have type 1 diabetes, eating strictly LCHF for over a year. This is not a race report of the marathon, so much, but rather a detailed analysis of my blood sugar levels from before the gun went off to when I crossed the finish line.  I wear a Dexcom G4 Continual Glucose Monitor. I inject the sensor and carry a receiver with me. It gives me minute-by-minute live blood sugar readings, which I have downloaded for you. As a diabetic, my body is unable to regulate my sugar levels. If my sugar level is good, then the session is good.

The marathon itself, as my first, surprised me by how hard it was. Everyone says 30km gets tough but you have to really experience it to believe it. I could not believe how incredibly tough it was to keep going in the last 10km. My body was fine, but my brain was mush. I was trying to finish at 4hrs, and was on that pace until 30km, but then ended at 4:17. Definitely room to improve for next year. More physical training and certainly more mental toughness will help me last to the final 200 metres.

My sugar levels and my energy levels were excellent.

Interestingly, I tested my blood ketones (to test how “deep” in ketosis I am) before and after the race too, just to see what was going on. At the start, 05:30, my blood ketones were 0.5 mmol/L. This is pretty average for me. I really battle to get higher levels of ketones than that. After the race (11:00), my ketones were 1.5 mmol/l. This illustrated to me that my body is able to access fat burning when it needs it.

I have graphed it and the link below gives a good visual – however I’ve also provided it in detail below.

lewism

Background:

  1. Target range for blood sugar level is between 4mmol/l and 7mmol/l.
  2. During training/race, it is risky to have the sugar levels too low and if they drop below 4 mmol/l, then that causes all sorts of problems. At around 3mmol/l, you get reduced effort, an inability to push yourself, lethargy, and as it gets lower, I run the risk of passing out.
  3. Equally difficult for people with type 1 diabetes is the risk of the sugar level going too high. It is commonly understood that exercise reduces blood sugar level, but only if your blood sugar is below approximately 13mmol/l. Any higher than that, then exercise triggers a response that will increase the blood sugar level further. High blood sugars are extremely uncomfortable (not to mention dangerous), and exercise is not really possible.
  4. So during a race, my target range moves from between 4 – 7mmol/l to between 6 – 9mmol/l.

Race Day:

  1. Sugar levels were excellent during the night. Trending between 4mmol/l and 6mmol/l.
  2. There is something called the Dawn Effect, which causes everyone’s blood sugars to rise just at dawn. My Dawn Effect kicked off at 4am, and took my sugar (not caused by eating anything) from 4 to 7mmol/l.
  3. Before the race, my sugar level had stabilised. I take a cup of super-salty soup stock (taken from The Art and Science of Low Carb Living), and two coconut fat bombs (basically coconut oil, coconut butter sweetened with stevia). The fat bombs are to get in some good fuel from the coconut (which contain saturated fats) just before exercise – this is something you need to play around with, as everyone has a different tolerance level to coconut oil.
  4. You can see at the start of the race my sugar level then starts to rise again. This is a strange phenomenon that I have noticed. I think it is caused by the tiny amount of carbs in the fat bombs and soup stock, as well as the body utilising the last of the glucose stores in the muscles. This increase in sugar never lasts long. You can see here that it increased from 6am to 6:20am. The sugar level was taken from a stable 7mmo/l up to 10mmol/l.
  5. Then it becomes a waiting game. I take zero carbs, and wait for my sugar levels to drop. I know they will. It usually takes over an hour. I check my Continuos Glucose Monitor all the time. Blood sugar stays stable at around 9-10mmol/l for 90 minutes.
  6. Then, over the course of the next 60 minutes, my sugar level slowly descends from around 9mmol/l to 5mmol/l.
  7. I don’t let it drop below 5mmol/l, and therefore I take my glucose supplements that I carry with me. I use Dextro Tabs, where each tab is approximately 3g of carb. I end up taking 10 tablets as I am feeling my sugar levels dropping further. So I take a total of 30g carb around the 2:30 hour mark.
  8. You can see over the next 20 mins that my blood sugar levels stabilise and then drop again. At this point, I am feeling very poor on the marathon. I am not thinking clearly, and just trying to survive.
  9. Instead of taking more Dextro Tabs, I elect to take some coke at the water stations. I take a small serving of coke (100ml) at each of the last 3 water stations. This is a total of 300ml of coke or a further 30g of carbs.
  10. You can see what this extra boost of carbs did for my sugar level in the last 30 mins of the race.
  11. Immediately after the race, my sugar levels stabilised at 9mmol/l.
  12. About half an hour after the race, my sugar level started to increase again. I think this is a result of taking coke too close to the end of the race, and not having enough exercise to burn it up. I should have stopped drinking coke about 30 mins before the end.
  13. I corrected this high blood sugar by taking insulin, and then I treated myself to a binge meal (and beer – I did just complete a marathon after all 🙂 ) and that caused the last spike in sugar around 12:30pm.

So there you have it. 4 hours massive effort on 60g carb, and the 60g ended up being probably about 10g too much.

Comparatively speaking, 1 Gu gel is 22g of carb.

LCHF is the answer!

 *Dietitian and colleague Caryn Zinn aptly changed the acronym. It works.

Type 1 diabetes, endurance sport and the LCHF approach: Lewis’ story.

I first met Lewis about a year ago when he came in to see me for a consultation. He will explain his story below, but the crux of it was that he wanted to ensure he was on the right track with his food intake as he started on a low carbohydrate, high fat (LCHF) diet to help his blood sugar control and his endurance sport. In reality, I merely confirmed what Lewis was already doing. Lewis had some trouble finding a lot of information for people with type 1 diabetes who undertake endurance sport, so felt the more he could share his experience, the better it will be for others looking to transition to a low carbohydrate, high fat diet for their blood sugar control. Despite what you may believe, it is not dangerous to follow an LCHF approach to diet if you have diabetes (type 1 or type 2). In fact, it’s quite the opposite. Thanks, Lewis, and over to you.

I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes 30 years ago, aged 9 years. I have always been a well-controlled diabetic, (according to the ‘diabetes guidelines’). About 3 years ago, I started training daily. It started out being just gym, then moved on to training for triathlons. Doing exercise is a vital part of a control plan for someone with type 1 diabetes, but it isn’t always easy to balance the amount of sugar, exercise and insulin. It is this balance between the amount of sugar, exercise and insulin that they call the ‘three legs of a stool’. They all are vital, and without any one of them, the chair will fall over. I try and keep my sugar levels above 4 and below 8 mmol/L, what is considered ‘normal’ and is typically controlled by the body’s natural hormonal processes in a person without diabetes.

What I found as I was training was that I was having to supplement large amounts of glucose whilst exercising to stop my sugar dropping. Then, after the exercise, my sugar levels would sky rocket to 15 mmol/L or higher. I would have to take extra insulin to counter the extra high blood sugar, and that would drive my sugar right down low again. It is this extreme roller-coaster of sugar levels that I interpreted as being necessary if one wanted to participate in endurance training. I would typically require a Gu gel every 20 – 30 minutes to stop my sugar dropping. On a four hour bike ride, that would be a massive (and expensive) 8 Gu gels, taking in approximately 160g of carbs. My sugars would be ok during the ride but then would skyrocket afterward.

Also, I had no confidence what my sugar level at any one time would be. If it was in the “good” range, was it only temporary? Was it on its way up, or on its way down? After having diabetes for 25 years, I still had no idea at all. I was thin, muscular, getting fitter and fitter. But my sugar levels were extremely erratic. I was pre-occupied with food, and was always hungry.

Then, a number of things happened all in the same month, October 2013:

  1. I heard Grant Schofield speak about LCHF diets
  2. I watched a Youtube clip of Dr Troy Stapleton, an Australian doctor who developed diabetes and eats LCHF. He said his inspiration was Dr Richard Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution.
  3. I read that book, and it pretty much changed my life. Dr Bernstein is an engineer who was diagnosed with Diabetes in the 1950s. He was the first person to do “home glucose monitoring” and turned the industry on its head, saying patients needn’t go to hospital to check their blood sugar. He later became a doctor (in his 40’s) to specialise in diabetes, and further the cause for good blood control.

He was, and remains, and engineer at heart. His basis for blood sugar control is one only an engineer could come up with. In a nutshell, you can’t predict what your sugar level will do. You can’t get the balance right between sugar and insulin. You will always be wrong. If you happen to be right, it is only by accident. He was describing me, and my rollercoaster sugar control. He explains that if you don’t eat carbs, then you don’t need as much insulin. If you don’t take as much insulin, then you don’t need as much carbs. I switched to LCHF in October 2013, and did my first Half Ironman in Jan 2014. I had submitted a detailed race report to Grant about this race.  Fast forward a year later and I have never looked back.

In terms of the food, eating becomes easier and easier. I do the cooking at home, which is quite useful!

My typical breakfasts now comprise an omelette with 3 eggs, chopped mushroom and chopped tomato. Alternatively, I soft boil 3 eggs, and have them with an avo and tomato salad.

My typical lunch would comprise a green salad with left-overs from the night before. I take care to make enough supper to leave something for lunch the next day.

Typical suppers in our house are below; it is all organic, whole food and high in fat.

  • Spaghetti bolognaise with low carb mung bean pasta (less than 5g net carbs for a big bowl of pasta). covered with olive oil and cheese.
  • Pizza on pizza base made from 1 cup almond flour, 1 egg, 1tbs olive oil, 1 tsp salt. (makes enough for 2 pizzas. very filling)
  • Hamburger on a bread roll made from 1/3 cup almond flour, 1/3 cup ground linseed, 1tsp baking powder, 1 egg, 1tbsp olive oil, 1tbsp cream, 1/2tsp salt. Baked in a mini-round tin, comes out like perfect soft bread roll.
  • Creamed mushroom soup (lots of mushrooms, cream, soup stock) served with Almond bread toasted slices. I make a large almond and linseed loaf once a week, slice it and freeze the slices for ready toast.
  • Bangers and mash (using cauliflower mash)
  • Fried chicken thighs (fatty and juicy) served with a green salad laden with olives and cheese
  • Fish fingers and “chips”. The fish finger batter is coconut flour and seasoning. Fried in Coconut oil. The chips are the same recipe as the pizza base but rolled thinner. Baked until brown and crispy. Add salt and the kids love it.
  • Butter chicken and rice (using cauliflower rice)
  • Taco night where it’s all the Mexican trimmings on either cauliflower tortillas, or large fresh crisp iceberg lettuce pieces as tortillas.

I try keep the level of protein at every single meal the same. Approximately the size of a deck of cards.

With regard to my sugar control and insulin levels during the year…

There is a test called HbA1c, which measures the average blood sugar over the last 3 months. The traditional diabetes practitioners (such as where I go at North Shore Hospital) have this range up, and the red oval shows where the practitioners try to have you aim your sugar levels.

hba1c

A non-diabetic is supposed to be 5%. The reason the practitioners want us diabetics to be at an average of 8-10. (which is too high, as the non-diabetic body wants to be at 5%, is that (as a diabetic) when you eat regular carbs, you blood sugar will always rise after a meal. It can rise to 10 or 12, and then come back down again. This is “normal”. So, if your sugars are always rising to 10-12 after a meal, and your average is sitting at 5, it can only mean one thing. You have many many dangerous low blood sugar hypos.

I take 2 different insulin types. I take a long acting insulin called Lantis, which processes the natural sugars the body creates. (nothing to do with food). I also take a short-acting insulin (purpose made to handle carbs in food) each time I eat. My long acting Lantis dose has not really changed since going LCHF.

Now, when I was eating my traditionally healthy high carb low fat diet, I was taking between 10 and 12 units of short-acting Humalog each meal. My sugar would absolutely rise after the meal, then I would more likely than not correct it, then it would fall too low. Hence the terrible roller coaster. I assumed, as does the Diabetes Clinic, that to achieve non-diabetic levels of blood sugar control, it required a lot of low blood sugar hypos. I would have had to correct my low blood sugars hypos 3 – 4 times a day.

Nowadays, eating LCHF, I would typically take 1-2 units per meal. This is only for the hidden carbs in vegetables etc. If I was stricter in my eating, I could reduce that dose even further. I have since had to buy a “paediatric” insulin pen, which allows me to dose in half units. Which is quite something. My sugar never rises after a meal. Then, because I am taking very small insulin doses, it doesn’t drop down low either.

My last HbA1c reading was 5.6 and then 3 months later 5.3. A cause for celebration really, as this is approaching non-diabetic levels. The Diabetes Clinic sister on duty was extremely unhappy, and had to call a supervisor. They were not happy letting me drive home. They could only deduce that for my levels to be so low, I must have been having many many dangerous hypos.

I took it upon myself to explain diabetes to them. “If I take no carbs, then my sugar won’t go up. If take no insulin then my sugar won’t come down”. I can manage my sugar in a very accurate range. I have very few hypos, and when I do, their intensity to slight (ie, not powerful caused by large over-doses of insulin). And that by following their protocols, I would have many more.

lewis

Lewis completing the Auckland Marathon last weekend (November 2nd, 2014). Note the glucose monitor on his left arm.