Will that high protein diet kill you?

After last Tuesday’s television show ‘how not to get cancer’ I got a number of concerned emails and Facebook messages from people questioning their protein intake. Specifically,  information that a high protein diet increases health risk and mortality. As a nutritionist who advocates a higher protein load, here’s what I’ve read about the role of protein and disease, as written by people much smarter than I am:

Information regarding health risks associated with a high protein intake has been critically reviewed by experts in the field, specifically the way the population dietary data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Studies (NHANES) was analysed to determine that higher levels of protein increase overall health risk. The major criticisms were:

  • They eliminated half of the data points with no explanation;
  • Their definition of low protein (below 10%) should in fact be labelled as ‘inadequate protein’ as defined by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) protein ranges (10-35% of dietary energy), and in New Zealand adequate protein is 15-25% of energy in diet. The arbitrary cut-off used by the authors meant less than 450 people fell into the ‘low protein’ group;
  • The population data gathered dietary information via a single 24-hour diet recall once in an 18-year period; and
  • Body weight or body mass index (BMI) was not reported – given the clear association between excess body fat and chronic disease such as cancer, cardiovascular disease etc, this was a massive oversight.

While the paper outlined in the review also looked at laboratory trials, these were based on rodent studies and not clinical trials in humans. Differences in metabolic rate, the way we utilise nutrients and digestive tracts (the rodents more able to handle fibrous foods than ours) means that, despite interesting findings, we cannot conflate the findings here to humans, as they are not directly transferable.

Other points to note regarding research suggesting that a lower protein diet is good for longevity:

  • Many of the studies are based on rodent studies (not humans) and, in addition to what I posted above, the type of protein studied is typically casein – a dairy protein that has more potential to be inflammatory and one rodents are not naturally adapted to consume;
  • High amounts of dairy protein have been found to increase insulin, triglycerides and result in excess body fat compared to other sources of protein provided to the rodents;
  • Much of the research also show that it could be an effect of a high methionine intake which – when not balanced with other amino acids such as gelatin) for some people, can build up the amount of homocysteine (another amino acid) that increases risk of cardiovascular disease;
  • As we age, we are at greater risk of sarcopenia, dyopenia and poor health due to falls if we don’t have a decent amount of muscle mass, which requires protein to help lay down this muscle;
  • The majority of studies point to a higher protein intake being protective for quality of life as we age, not detrimental; and
  • We become more anabolic resistant as we age, meaning we are unable to lay down muscle the way we are when we are younger to the same extent. This could be as a result of both inactivity and lower levels of oestrogen and testosterone, meaning the a higher protein intake is required (in addition to resistance training).

And here is what I know regarding a low protein diet in the real-world setting:

  1. People are hungry. Women, especially, struggle to eat an appropriate amount of food when they restrict protein. This restriction (intentional or otherwise) leads to poor blood sugar control, poor appetite control and mood problems (either low mood or increased anxiety).
  2. People can only restrict for so long until it backfires. A lower protein intake might be totally fine on a Monday, things are okay on a Tuesday, but by Wednesday people are climbing the walls looking for something to eat. Or, for some, this process happens across the course of a day. This means that despite having a decent amount of food at dinner, the undereating of protein across the day leaves you standing in the kitchen at 8pm looking for something to eat and wondering why you are not hungry, but just ‘not satisfied’.
  3. Practically speaking, when you restrict protein, what is there left to eat? Carbohydrate. We eat until our minimum requirement for protein is filled and, in the absence of quality protein sources we will overeat on calories (specifically carbohydrate calories) until this requirement is met. For many, this results in poor nutrient status, poor blood sugar control and excess body fat. It’s these three things which have consistently been found to result in increased risk of metabolic disease and cancer, not the protein load.
  4. People (generally speaking) fare best when we base their meals around protein and then toggle the fat and carbohydrate around that, based on their body composition and their activity levels. For many, this is more than a palm sized serve at each meal, and across the course of the day, for most people, this is at least 100g of protein from foods that are quality protein foods. In New Zealand, we get most of our protein (according to the most recent nutrition survey – which is 10 years old, actually) from bread. Bread! Wheat derived protein is one of the lower quality sources we can eat, with the amino acids not being as easy to digest and assimilate as those from animal-based sources.

So, clinically I am not at all concerned about advocating a moderate-high protein load for most people, and the television show last Tuesday did nothing to change my view on it. A longevity diet approach which is low in protein looks promising for a week a few times a year to confer benefits of fasting related to lifespan, but in terms of a day-to-day diet it will likely leave you frail, hungry and irritable. There is not enough human data to show that this approach will lead to a longer life, but I gotta say, it doesn’t sound like an enjoyable way to live beyond 100 years. Most evidence points to muscle mass being extremely important as we age to maintain quality of life and health span. This requires adequate protein and resistance training. In the words of Robb Wolf (as said on a recent podcast), we need to “eat and move in a way that lays down as much muscle as we can now, and then fight like the devil to keep it”.

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A good source of protein, and pretty delicious (PC: healthline.com)

Holiday weight gain? Read this.

Easter and Anzac has meant that, for many, it’s enough for more than just a mini-break. And who doesn’t love a holiday? A break away from early alarm clocks, work and household chores. When out of your own space you’re forced to leave behind the normal routines that are well established in everyday life, which is obviously why we come back feeling refreshed and ready to get back into it. The problem, though, is that many people panic about getting out of routine with their food and exercise – what if that 10 days in Fiji goes and undoes the last three months of hard work and they end up gaining weight?

Well, it won’t. Why?

1. You are a LOT more active on holiday compared to real life: driving to work and sitting in an office does not afford the same opportunity to be as active as sight-seeing does. I clocked up almost double the number of steps as I normally would when I was away. Even on days we didn’t run, relying on both public transport and my feet to see a city racked up enough steps so I was regularly doing 23,000 or more each day. However, if you’re a lounge-around-the-pool kind of vacationer, if you had a hit out in the hotel gym, you can avoid weight gain for a short term holiday in the face of a calorie excess.

2. You sleep more: lack of sleep will drive up insulin and cortisol levels and create a hormonal environment that is unfavourable for fat loss. Even if you have the perfect diet (if there is such a thing), no amount of calorie counting, carb watching, or protein eating will make up for the string of 5-6 hours a night you manage during the week when work, exercise and home duties take up so much time, you stay up later than you know you should just to enjoy a little time out.

3. You’re generally more relaxed. The everyday stress created by school pick-ups, work deadlines and weekend sport might be ‘normal’ life, but don’t underestimate the effect this can have on your ability to lose weight. While we may not know the underlying mechanisms, like the effects of sleep deprivation, a chronic overload of stress will increase hormones responsible for fat gain regardless of what you eat or how much exercise you do. In fact, for some, their normal stress relief of going for a run or doing an F45 class will only add to the stress bucket, further exacerbating a weight loss stall. And, when stressed, we often reach for food that is high in calories, low in nutrients.

What if it does?

If you were maintaining or losing weight prior to going away on holiday, then that tells me you’ve got the tools necessary to help you refocus on an eating style and exercise routine that will easily shed any fat gain that is the result of too many cocktails by the pool.

Actual fat gain will be quite minimal, and pretty easy to shift – potentially easier than what you were finding before your holiday. The additional calories eaten on holiday aren’t all stored as fat (at all!) We restock depleted glycogen, and for some, short term overfeeding  increases resting metabolic rate in response to increased food (as many of the overfeeding studies conducted under laboratory conditions have found). Even if you have a predisposition for weight gain, the amount of weight you can is usually far less than the excess calories eaten would predict.

However, for those panicking about the additional fat gain (if any):

1. Up the protein intake. This will help reduce any carb-related cravings from too many pancakes/baked goods/fat chips. Aim for foods that will provide 30g of protein per meal (as an example, a 150g beef steak has about 37g of protein, 3 large eggs around 24g of protein). This will help fill you up and regulate blood sugar, preventing any dip in energy that might be exacerbated by lack of sleep or jetlag. Combined with strategies listed below, it’s a recipe for fat loss.

2. Lay off the alcohol. I tend to drink a bit more wine and beer when on holiday. Despite that I don’t drink any more than 1-2 glasses, it is more than what I’d normally drink in ‘real life’. If you’re like me, then take a break for a week or two  – not a long time, but enough to help get over my post-holiday blues (alcohol is a depressant after all) and to ‘break the habit’ as it were.

3. Drop back the fat intake – if you’ve gained excess body fat, then we want your body to tap into this (potentially) accessible fuel source – this obviously requires a calorie deficit. There is no need to seek out ‘low fat’ foods or avoid foods that naturally contain fat (i.e. egg yolks), however reducing down the amount of added fat to meals (via sauces, dressings, cooking oils, nut butters etc) will help reduce the calorie content of your diet with minimal effort.

4. Drop back the carbohydrate intake – some people benefit from doing a 21 day low (er than normal) carbohydrate diet. I know what you’re thinking – if I drop the fat AND the carbs, what do I eat? I’m talking short-term here – you base your meals around protein and titrate fat and carbohydrate according to that. If you know you feel better with a bit of carbohydrate in your diet, that’s no issue – just make it good quality (i.e. kumara, potato) and make it a moderate serving. However, ample amounts of even low sugar carbohydrate (like rice, pasta, bread etc) will make it more difficult to shift.

5. Include plenty of vegetables – base your meals around these. The prebiotic fibre can help improve the gut environment after a week or more of too much fried foods (though that cheese hoagie was delicious) and too much alcohol. Splashing raw apple cider vinegar (ACV) on steamed vegetables ups the taste factor and helps reduce post-prandial (post-meal) blood sugar, making you less likely to search for something sweet. In addition, you can go for gold on most non-starchy vegetables, so fill your plate to help fill you up.

6. Lift weights. Heavy ones. If you don’t have access to a gym then even body weight exercises (such as press-ups, squats, lunges) if not doing them, will create stress to help you build muscle. I’m not suggesting you avoid lacing up for your long run – I’m a long-distance runner after all! –  resistance training, though, is metabolically demanding in the short term, and in the long term will preserve your resting metabolic rate to allow you to burn fat in everyday life. Plus, you’ll improve strength. Bonus.

7. Consider fasting. Be it the 5:2 protocol that I utilise in my fat-loss plans, a 16:8 protocol that is popular (i.e. fast from 8pm to 12pm the next day, or Super-fasting as per the Schofield/Zinn protocol outlined in What the Fast, it’s consistently found to improve metabolic health markers and can reduce calorie intake to elicit a fat-loss response. Note: I’m not talking about some excessive ‘not going to eat till Friday’ type fast. But shorten that eating window.

8. Get plenty of sleep – try to get back into a 7-8h per night habit with this one and be disciplined about it, for reasons I outlined above.

And, finally (and most importantly), does it matter? I mean, does it truly matter that you come back from an awesome time away with a couple of additional kilograms? Part of the beauty of a holiday is leaving behind all of the routines of your day to day life, including exercise and your normal foods for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Many of us need a mental break almost as much as a physical one, and this includes a break from your usual diet and exercise regime. You will come back feeling refreshed and ready to embrace these with renewed energy (or being in a mindset of change for the better, if that is more appropriate).

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LCHF and IF for the female endurance athlete (IMHO).

Following on from the couple of blogs I wrote about Dan’s LCHF athlete lifestyle, I got a lot of messages from women regarding my opinion of it for the female endurance athlete. Great question, especially as – if you look at social media – there are nutritionists who warn against the danger of LCHF (and intermittent fasting) for women, to the point that the blanket statement is that it is harmful and not to be undertaken. Whilst it is hard to be objective in the nutrition space – all of us influenced to some degree by our own experiences – the low carbohydrate and fasting space seems to bring with it its own special degree of hysteria. The prevailing message is that both low carbohydrate diets and fasting is too stressful on the endocrine system of females (which regulates hormones) and causes a reduction in metabolism and reproductive potential. Thus, it is to be avoided at all costs. This point of view may be drawn from clinical experience of the practitioner and be dependent on the type of client they see. If their target audience are women who have struggled with maintaining a healthy weight and have problems with eating enough, then the opinion of the practitioner could well be influenced by this (and is entirely sensible!) Likewise, I see many women who’s hormones benefit from periods of intermittent fasting while utilising a LCHF protocol. What we see in clinic will dictate our points of view, regardless of how objective we try to be.

I have in the past written about the negative impact of fasting and calorie restriction on the expression of genes that regulate kisspeptin in the body, a hormone involved in our reproductive cycle. However I will point out that the effects seen in studies conducted in rodents may be more dramatic than if they were carried out as clinical trials in humans. Rodents have a much faster metabolism, thus a 24h fast for a mouse is equivalent to a 3 day fast in humans. Likewise, chronic caloric restriction over a week, where the mice lose close to a quarter of their body weight (and which is thought to be responsible for the downregulation of the kisspeptin receptors that result in negative effects) may be equivalent to 12 or more weeks. Rodent models in science are great for illustrating potential mechanisms, but can never be viewed as hard data as it pertains to humans.

Alongside any scientific data that exists, I think it’s important to step back and consider perspective here. What we should all be aware of is that there is no one right dietary approach for everyone, and often there is no one dietary approach to suit someone for the rest of their lives. As things change, so do our nutritional requirements. Low carbohydrate diet and intermittent fasting is not exempt from this – therefore to say that it is not suitable for any woman is, quite frankly, erroneous and misrepresents what we see in the literature and what we see clinically. While certainly a vast majority of the studies investigating lower carbohydrate diets have been conducted in males, there are studies showing a positive impact for overweight women with infertility. Further, it is accepted best practice to include periods of low glycogen availability in the training schedules of athletes. Even in the researchers who err on the side of pro-carbohydrate diets recommend cycling carbohydrate intake to be sometimes low, and sometimes high, to upregulate fat oxidation pathways that allow the athlete to become more efficient at burning fat. To state that no female athlete should start an exercise session in a fasted state goes against current best practice for endurance performance.

Possibly the negative impacts of fasting and low carbohdyrate diets are not about the fasting period or the carbohydrate content – it’s much more likely to represent chronic underfuelling – i.e. a lack of calories over an extended period of time, with no thought given to cycling of both energy intake and/or macronutrients. It’s just low, full stop. That’s why it is important to work with an experienced sports nutrition practitioner (like me, Kaytee Boyd, Caryn Zinn as some top picks) to ensure these training tactics are used to the advantage of the athlete in a training cycle, not to the detriment of them.

Don’t misread this as a recommendation to do all sessions in a fasted state, to undergo an intermittent fasting protocol that involves skipping breakfast every day of the week, or that everyone should adhere to a very low carbohydrate approach. If you’ve read any of my information (or followed anything I’ve suggested) then you’ll know this isn’t the case. The point of this blog is to remember that there is no one right dietary approach for everyone, and that if you’re successfully adhering to a lower carbohydrate diet with periods of intermittent fasting and feel it’s working well for you (ie no sleep, hormone, training or recovery problems), don’t be concerned with the rhetoric that exists regarding the harmful nature of this. You are your own best investigator when it comes to your nutrition, and your experience is the most important data when it comes to you.

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Post on IF, cue picture of empty plate with clock. #standard (PC http://www.stack.com)

The Plews on racing LCHF

Last week I detailed Kona Ironman age-group champion Dan Plews’ daily and training nutrition using a LCHF approach. How does this change in the lead up to an event, and what does he do on race day?

Like conventional sports nutrition principles, there is somewhat of a carbohydrate loading phase pre-race. This isn’t the 500-600g of carbohydrate that is recommended for most athletes in the three days before (which generally leaves an athlete feeling lethargic and bloated), however it is more than he would generally eat. Don’t forget that tapering for a race is, in effect, carbo loading, as the muscle glycogen stores are not depleted during training and it allows them the chance to be replenished and not in the deficit they normally are. Based on Rowlands paper which showed that a higher fat diet with a preload of carbohydrates, he’s dialled in his approach that Dan now feels works really well for him. He lifts his carbohydrate intake from the 80-100g he typically eats in the days prior. On the Wednesday (for a Saturday race), he will include additional potato or sweet potato in his evening meal, taking him to ~125g carbs per day. This increases to ~175g per day on Thursday and Friday (the two days before the race) – including fruit alongside the potato or sweet potato. In addition, he makes sure snacks etc on hand are low carbohydrate so  not to be caught out during the lead up period with having to rely on the petrol station or four square options. If you do have to rely on these, and are looking for lower carbohydrate, then biltong, cheese snacks, even lower carbohydrate protein bars can be good stop gaps. On race morning before Dan’s Kona race he opted for was porridge: oats with a bit of Super Starch added, which is a slow release carbohydrate to not inhibit fat burning, and is a higher molecular weight carbohydrate, so it is easier to digest.

During the race:

Despite research studies in this area using a ‘train low glycogen, race low glycogen’ model to determine the efficacy of a LCHF approach for sports performance, in practice Dan follows what practitioners advocate: a ‘train low, race high’ model. Ideally, the train low approach has enabled you to increase your efficiency to burn fat as a fuel source in addition to using carbohydrate that you have stored or take on board, thus maximising the amount of fuel you have available. Dan takes in around 50g carbohydrate per hour;  because he is very efficient at burning fat, he doesn’t need as much carbohydrate as he would otherwise. A real benefit of this is that it minimises the likelihood of gut issues many endurance athletes experience during a long event – the more carbohydrate fuel you have to take on board, the more opportunity there is to get the dose wrong. Importantly though, the more fatigued you become, the more your body will divert blood supply away from the gut to the muscles, and thus impacting on your ability to digest the fuel.  During Kona Dan used energy blocks with gels on the bike, and a couple of gels with some swigs of sports drink or coke during the run. His paper Different Horses on the Same Courses outlines how to take this individualistic approach to fuelling, as will his online course that you can sign up to by clicking here.

Finally, post-race, Dan gets back on board the LCHF approach fairly swiftly, as he has seen the impact that a higher carbohydrate fuelling day has on his blood glucose level across the course of the following week. It certainly doesn’t reduce down to normal levels the day after, and it’s likely that inflammation and muscle damage impacts on this too. Your best bet is to (as soon as possible) get back to your LCHF diet and help your recovery process.

LCHF for the top end:

Whilst LCHF is increasingly more accepted in the endurance space as part of the approach, what about at that top end – does it limit performance there? There is very little quality research on this, however Dan’s research group found that there was no detriment to perform high intensity intervals (as I blogged about here), but the jury is definitely out on this point and I wonder if, like many things, it is individual. A person’s ability to metabolise fat as a fuel source and use it at a higher intensity is trainable for sure (that’s what fat adaptation is all about), but there could be individuals who are less able to produce ketones to be used for energy – this is speculation though on my part. Yes, there is a down regulation in pyruvate dehydrogenase which helps turn stored carbohydrate into glucose for energy, however the importance of this is questionable given the increased availability of fat for fuel, and there may be other enzymes upregulated to counteract this change in the fuel use. A potential way around this issue (and to ensure glucose metabolism is continued on your LCHF approach) is to do higher intensity efforts in training that force liver to convert glycogen to glucose – thus keeping glucose oxidation pathways high. I’m also beginning to recommend that people take on a small amount of glucose pre-high intensity sessions if they are beginning the fat adaptation phase during a training cycle that incorporates higher intensity efforts. Ideally your fat adaptation phase will occur during base training when we can keep intensity low. But that isn’t always possible. Fifteen-20g glucose prior to training for these high intensity sessions can keep output high but is unlikely to be enough to “ruin” your adaptation process. Again, there is no research behind these numbers, but from a practice perspective I’ve seen this work well.

Finally, you know I’m an advocate of ketones to help support training whilst lower carbohydrate, and it certainly has helped me and many of my clients. We don’t at this point know enough about ketone utilisation in the body and whether taking exogenous ketones downregulates the body’s ability to produce them. This is an emerging field we are looking at with interest with regards to dosage, timing, type of ketone supplement etc. There has been decades of research into carbohydrate as a performance enhancer, and we can probably expect that it will take a few years of research for these questions to be answered in the science research space. Trying them yourself is likely the best approach to see how they impact your own performance (and I can help you with that).

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Plews at Kona (PC http://www.trizone.com.au)

LCHF and the athlete: The Plews approach

Sfuels, a ketogenic fuel for endurance athletes recently had Dan Plews host a Facebook live event regarding his LCHF training and daily diet. Now those of you have listened to our Fitter Radio podcast will know Dan from the Plews and Prof segment. He’s an exercise physiologist who last year was the overall age group winner at Kona World Championships in a record time of 8:24. He’s been working in exercise physiology for the last 15 years and has a number of research papers both related to this, and in the ketogenic diet space (for athletes), one of which I posted about last year. Because I love Dan’s work (and this area in general) I wanted to outline for you what he spoke about in the Facebook live for those people, athlete or otherwise, that are interested. This week, due to length, I’ll cover the normal diet, and next week I’ll outline his pre-race and race-day strategy.

As a bit of background, Dan has been doing triathlon forever, however came into LCHF when he was at the Olympics as an exercise physiologist and came across work by Tim Noakes (who has heralded the latest Banting movement in South Africa). From 2012 he made a decision to give it a crack. Even now, though, six years after embarking on LCHF training and nutrition, Dan notes that adaptations are still occurring, and puts his incremental improvements in performance in the Ironman distance finishing times (in hours:minutes) being: 9:22, 9:11, 9:12, 8:54, 8:35 and 8.24 Kona 2018) down to not only the consistency of training , but the consistency of the dietary approach.

What is important in LCHF and endurance training? The end goal for performance is to conserve as much energy as possible – fuel availability is the limiting factor over such a long distance. We can’t store too much carbohydrate – around 2000 Calories compared to 40000 Calories of fat that is stored in even the leanest individuals. The problem, though, is that people can’t access their fat stores to exercise at a high intensity. Or even, for many endurance athletes, at a lower intensity (where we should be able to burn fat). The type of diet we eat influences our fuel preference when we exercise, and the modern diet (where carbohydrate is the predominant available nutrient) makes athletes much more reliant on carbohydrate which – like kindling on a fire – is likely to run out quickly.  We want to be metabolically flexible, that is, to burn more fat as a fuel source and only use carbohydrate when we really need it. Dan has tested his fuel utilisation in a laboratory and can burn fat at 1.3g/minute (the FASTER study reported around 1.6g/minute) – most people are around 0.6g/minute or thereabouts. However research such as that done by Volek and colleagues have shown it is possible to shift that if you go LCHF. From the testing that Dan has done, he knows that at his race intensity on the bike, an average 260 watts, his fuel utilisation is around 66% from fat stores. This allows him to preserve a lot of carbohydrate when working at this race pace intensity.

Ideally, that preservation of carbohydrate stores to use at the back end of a race when energy availability is limited should be the aim of the endurance athlete (and is extremely challenging if they are burning predominantly carbohydrate from the start). In addition, the lower LCHF diet means having lower blood glucose levels on a day-to-day basis,  important for overall health and body composition goals too. Higher sugars equals higher insulin, which is a nutrient delivery hormone – therefore there is more opportunity for fatty acids in the blood stream being stored in our fat tissue. Don’t go thinking we want rock bottom insulin levels all of the time, as insulin itself is critical for life! However ideally our levels would be low outside of the time period around meals, as elevated insulin is linked to a number of metabolic disease processes. In addition, when following a LCHF approach, we have lower stores of carbohydrate, which makes us more sensitive to the signalling for fat adaptation and upregulating of fat oxidation pathways.

So… the details?

Dan’s diet on a day-to-day basis:

  • Coffee with cream, collagen and MCT (medium chain triglyceride, our body can’t store this and is an easily used energy source)
  • SFuel bar (low carb snack)
  • Training – doesn’t eat during training, but if he does it may be a SFuel drink (MCT/branched chain amino acid (BCAA) drink mixed with some other compounds, but it is a higher fat option)
  • Breakfast is eggs, avocado, some vegetables
  • Lunch is tuna salad or similar. During heavier training load, he may add a bit of paleo bread (around 20g carbohydrate, similar to normal bread but this is made of better quality ingredients)
  • Dinner is salad with a steak
  • Snacks may be macadamias, almonds and pickles.
  • Fruit may come into it from time to time, particularly as the training load and intensity ramps up.

While not ketogenic in way that he eats, he will still likely be in ketosis during the day – by virtue of training and his normal diet is low carbohydrate – it’s around 80g – 100g carbs per day, thus naturally depleting his stored carbohydrate (glycogen). Ketogenesis is a is a physiological state, not a diet, thus it’s less important to stick rigidly to foods labelled as ketogenic and to think more globally about it. My athlete plan  is based around these dietary principles, and there are likely some nuances for the female athlete, but this general approach works well for most people I work with. It could be important for a carbohydrate refeed 1-2x per fortnight if following a very low carbohydrate diet, and that’s something I recommend to my athletes on the basis that hormonal responses will be favourable. This isn’t something I’ve seen a lot in the literature, but based more on clinical experience (and may be more important for the leaner athlete).

As I mentioned, I’ll cover off the race day side of things next week. However, if you’re keen to know more about what Dan recommends, then definitely check out his new site – he’s developing an online course that details specifics for coach and athlete alike, and is releasing it soon!

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Kona 2018. (PC: oxygenaddict.com)

Should you take probiotics after a round of antibiotics? The answer may surprise you!

Two recent studies have recently been published that cast doubt on taking probiotics to help recover from a course of antibiotics. Crazy right? Ask anyone and they would tell you the opposite (as I would have). However sometimes research comes out that contradicts what we would previously have thought, and we have to be open to the idea that what we believed was in fact incorrect. The saturated-fat-heart-disease hypothesis is a clear example of dietary dogma that has been turned on its head* (and the difficulty that people have getting their heads around).

Gut health 101: The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is like a hollow tube, and the cells of the GI tract are covered by a thick protective gel, and that is the mucus layer (the inside cells of the gut are called the lumen). Each of these areas have a distinct microbial community, however these are rarely studied as they are difficult to get to (unless you have an invasive colonoscopy). The stool microbiome is also part of this gut picture and is the most often studied proxy marker as the gut microbiome and these are often used interchangeably (i.e. the bacteria you see in the stool is what we would expect to find in the gut). Interestingly, one study found that the stool microbiome is not representative of the gut mucosal or lumen microbiome, which really presents a challenge to any practitioner or patient who wants a better understanding of their gut health. It also doesn’t tell us about the gut endothelial microbiome which may be the closest to explaining our gut health as it is the closest bacteria to the gut tissue. They found that there was only a 20% correlation between the stool and the gut microbiome. While stool testing can be helpful for identifying pathogens or parasites, it’s not so useful for us to understanding the presence of ‘good’ or ‘bad’ bacteria. Stool testing is one piece of the puzzle, but it’s better alongside other tests (such as a SIBO test).

When you take probiotics, the presence of these in your gut is transient, and this is something that people are unaware of. Hundreds of trials have showed the safety and efficacy of probiotics in benefiting people, but it’s not typically through the colonisation of our gut. Like many things, we are different in the level of colonisation that occurs when bacteria is introduced into the gut – some people are more permissive than others, and some are really resistant to it. The researchers were not able to determine exactly what makes someone a ‘permissive’ coloniser and a ‘resistant’ coloniser, however suggested that the presence of certain bacteria in the gut may play a role in this. However, they are still beneficial despite this – with significant changes in the gene expression of people who took the probiotics (19 downregulated and 198 upregulated genes), confirming the idea that probiotics work at a cellular level and can enhance the activity of genes in the gut, aid in digestion, stimulate the immune system etc.

A surprising finding from a second study was that probiotics slowed the recovery of the gut microbiome after a round of fairly potent antibiotics. In fact, this is what I (and other practitioners) always recommend their clients do. Flooding the system with good bacteria has been thought to prevent the adverse effects of the antibiotics. The study wanted to see how the probiotics affect the long-term gut ecosystem after a single dose of the broad-spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin and metronidazole (to ensure all gut microbiome was wiped out). This particular study (conducted in both mice and humans) split the participants into three groups: one took no probiotic and were left to spontaneously recover; one group took an 11 strain bacteria probiotic for four weeks immediately upon finishing the antibiotics and the final group actually had what is called an autolagus fecal microbiome transplant (aFMT) – this is when a person takes capsules of their own fecal matter that had previously been collected when their gut is in a good space. Remember, the gut doesn’t like change, so what better than to replace the bacteria with some of your own? The results found that treating the gut with a course of probiotics delayed the return of the normal gut microbiota by as long as five months after stopping the probiotic treatment, and microbiota diversity stayed low too – well lower than the group who took nothing. In fact, the researchers found the group left to their own spontaneous recovery had no major differences in their stool microbiota within 21 days post-antibiotics. This is so different to what we understood about the ability of the gut to recover post-antibiotics. Again, there will be differences in what practitioners recommend, but to the best of our knowledge we thought that it took a good 18-24 months for the gut to fully recover from a round of potent antibiotics. This is actually incorrect too: previous research (when you delve further) shows that this may be the case for one or two strains of bacteria, but the majority actually recover fairly quickly and the composition of the gut microbiota resembles pre-treatment composition.

The gut microbiome is resilient, perhaps more so than what I (and others) had believed. This is only good news!

The researchers found the lactobacillus in the probiotic was what prevented the colonisation of the native bacteria in those that took the probiotic. This is the most commonly used bacteria in most probiotic strains. Again, this doesn’t mean that probiotics are NOT helpful in general (from the immune regulating benefits and what I’ve mentioned above) and we also don’t know how other probiotics which don’t contain the lactobacillus bacteria affect the gut (such as the yeast saccharomyces boulardis). There are so many different combinations of antibiotics and probiotics out there – and this is specific to this particular strain of probiotics and the type of antibiotic used. So it’s by no means the nail in the coffin for probiotics post-antibiotics, however it does call into question the broad recommendation and is something worth talking to your health practitioner about.

*I’ve linked to one academic’s thoughts, and could have also linked to many many more (and studies) such as this one or this one. But this isn’t a post about saturated fat so I didn’t.

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LIttle microbiota in your body are more resilient than you think… so we may need to leave them to do their thing. PC: oregonsportsnews.com

Food rules.

I’m all for flexibility when it comes to what people eat. Labels like ‘vegan’, ‘paleo’, ‘keto’ for a lot of people aren’t particularly useful (even when self-imposed) if that means the structure of their food intake is tied up into the ‘rules’ of that particular diet. People panic when they are out of their own food environment and unable to eat according to the rules of their dietary ethos. While there are those who intuitively know they don’t need to rigidly eat the same foods or meals to be able to progress towards their health goals, this isn’t a widely appreciated concept. For some, diet ‘rules’ can create a certain degree of neuroticism around food; people argue it is a form of orthorexia at its worse – I’m not sure I agree with that, given the complexities associated with diagnosed eating disorders. Regardless, if the anxiety around food exists, it can lead the person to turn down invitations where their dietary rules will not be able to be adhered to, thus becoming socially isolated from their normal circle of friends. Or they may still attend with the intention not to eat, only to ‘cave in’; one small snack becomes a bit of a binge-fest because they have ‘blown it all.’ Both of these situations can make a person feel pretty terrible, and do nothing for their self-esteem.  You can see why, then, there are people who are adamantly against ‘rules’ around food.

However, I don’t agree that there shouldn’t be any structure around what, how, and when a person eats.  I think you’ll know I’m not suggesting this structure should equate specifically to a dogmatic dietary regime, such as only eating ‘paleo’ or ‘raw vegan’. I’m talking about rules that take the decision making out of some pretty common every day food experiences. Let’s face it, most people have a lot going on in their lives – we make 35,000 decisions per day (apparently!), 200 of them are food-related, though we are conscious of about 12-15 of them. Many people don’t have the bandwidth to be directly  making decisions about what to eat day-in, day-out (hence food plans like mine are awesome, btw). That’s what makes it so easy to ‘succumb’ to takeaways at the end of the day (I say ‘succumb’ as I know many people think it’s lack of willpower. Well, no, it’s more decision fatigue than anything else). Dogma around diet is, after all, the appeal of following it – someone else has deemed what you can eat and what you can’t. This takes the thinking out of it and works perfectly fine… until it doesn’t. And it doesn’t take long for it to start causing more headaches than not. The type of rules, then, that I’m thinking about are those which are akin to brushing your teeth. You just do them, they are non-negotiable. Once you get into the habit of them, you don’t even have the think about it.

The types of rules I’m thinking about include:

  1. Never eat standing up (therefore omitting mindless snacking).
  2. Brush your teeth after dinner (to avoid snacking later in the evening).
  3. Have at least one serve of vegetables at breakfast, and 2-3 at lunch and dinner.*
  4. Put all junk food in the house in an opaque container and keep high up in the pantry, so they aren’t having to see it every time they open the cupboard to prepare meals (out of sight, out of mind).
  5. Choose a protein choice (meat, eggs, fish) and vegetables first when eating a meal out, and then (if still hungry), choose something else. This will fill you up, so there is less room for other foods that are easy to overeat.
  6. Order dressings and sauces on the side (so you can control how much you use).

Instead of feeling anxious about having to decide what to eat, then constantly second-guessing what to do, simple guidelines like these can help you make better decisions in any context. They take the thinking out of it, therefore less energy is wasted and they aren’t constantly ruminating about what to eat. This creates less anxiety and neuroticism, and people can feel empowered and confident in their food decisions.  It’s less about the availability of specific food choices and more about way food is eaten, the environment it is eaten in, and the type of food. You don’t need to be perfect to be awesome, you just need to be consistent, and consistently approaching food in the same way (not deciding that you’ve ‘blown it all, so you’ll binge’ whenever you make a choice not deemed ‘suitable’ as part of your dietary regime).

From clinical experience, I find most people respond well to strategies such as those mentioned above.

One Simple Health Rule copy

If only it were this simple. (PC: theironyou.com)

Does HIIT take a hit on a ketogenic diet?

Much of the research points to the utility of a keto diet for increasing fat oxidation for longer, slower training. After a period of adaptation, athletes are then able to tap into an alternative fuel source which affords them an extensive supply of fuel at a steady rate, unlike carbohydrate (glycogen) stores which are limited and easily depleted in a moderate-long training session. Thus, it stands to reason athletes are able to go for longer than if they are straight carb-burning athletes in an endurance event – something that Maunder and colleagues discuss in this most recent paper outlining the practical application of a low carbohydrate diet for athletes of varying abilities. However many of the recent randomized trials (such as this one here) have found that performance, particularly at the top-end of the spectrum, is compromised when athletes switch to a lower carbohydrate approach. Further, the relative effort at a given heart rate is increased. You go slower, but it feels harder. Ouch. This understandably makes an athlete’s coache a little nervous to recommend their athletes go on a lower carbohydrate diet.

Interesting though, this is not the experience of many people I work with who transition to a lower carb diet. If anything, performance improves for the athlete (something I’ve written a lot about over the last few years, including this blog here). Given enough time, any reduction in power that occurs early in the transition phase appears to be reversed and the athlete comes out leaner, stronger and fitter in their endurance training. Reducing reliance on carbohydrate as a training fuel reduces the oxidative damage that occurs during training, thus inflammation is reduced. They aren’t placing their body under as much oxidative stress and therefore the athlete can train more consistently during the season with less risk of stress-related injury and illness. This may also be due to a higher presence of beta hydroxybutyrate in the bloodstream, which act as signalling molecules and increase the transcription of enzymes that encode antioxidant genes superoxide dismutase, catalase 2 and glutathione peroxidase. This helps scavenge free radicals created through training and protects the athlete from tissue damage. This may be one of the reasons why they are seeing better results with their key races.

Two of my mates felt similarly, and experienced similar benefits of adhering to a low carbohydrate diet, experiencing no detriment to high intensity training, despite what the research deemed. So they decided to test the hypothesis.

They took 18 male endurance athletes who were habitually eating a standard western diet, and randomised them to consume either their normal diet (control group), or a very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet, consisting of no more than 50g carbs per day for four weeks, and performed graded exercise tests before and after the experiment, and a HIIT session (5x3min, work/rest 2:1, passive recovery, total time 34min) before, and after 2 and 4 weeks.

The researchers found that (as expected) fat oxidation levels increased in the experimental group throughout the tests, and total time to exhaustion, performance in the HIIT session and rate of perceived exertion was no different between the groups. Ergo, the ketogenic diet did not impact the athlete’s ability to undergo high intensity training (nor make it seem harder for them). Interestingly, the level of protein in the diet was around 29%, higher than the 17% used in other studies – this could account for the level of ketones present in the blood stream that were lower at the end of the study (0.4 mmol/L), just out of the ‘nutritional ketosis’ range. The difference this may have made to the athletes’ performance, however, we don’t really know.

Many of the studies conducted that have found performance is reduced are likely too short to allow the athletes to adapt to a ketogenic diet, which is thought to take several weeks to months. Hopefully this new research makes you think twice about taking the results of a study like such as the one here, as a reason to dismiss the low carbohydrate diet for athletes.

To recap, then, of what we know is possible for athletes following a lower carbohydrate approach:

As a side note, lots of peeps look at the elite athlete who chows down on carbohydrate in racing and during everyday life and thinks to themselves that, if they can perform to that standard eating a higher carb approach, then why can’t I? A couple of points to note:

  • The elite athlete may train from 20-30 hours per week – by default they spend a lot of time in a depleted state, meaning they are likely training low glycogen as it is impossible to replenish carbohydrate at the rate they are burning it. This is going to afford them the same capacity to train in the lower carb state that provides enhanced training adaptations. The average age grouper may have time to train 12-18h a week maximum, and don’t have the volume available to get into the low glycogen state.
  • They are elite for a reason. They are able to go harder and faster than most people –psychologically they are able to hurt more and potentially go longer before they bonk – we age-groupers have more of a preservation mindset. They may also be able to train harder when in an inflamed state for this reason. I’m not saying this is ideal (far from it). I’m just putting it out there as a reason why there are professionals who are able to see results where others don’t.
  • Even at the top of the field the elite athlete can suffer, and far more than an age-grouper. Years of a nutrient-poor, carbohydrate rich diet and overreaching to the point of overtraining will leave an athlete burnt out and unable to continue on at the level they previously enjoyed. It might appear that elite athletes are bullet proof but I’m sure as you’re reading this you’re thinking of someone who falls into this category. Things aren’t always as they appear, and the golden glow of success can be pretty fleeting.
  • Of course, there are others who are just awesome and continue to turn up and take it out year after year, regardless of diet, training methods, lifestyle etc. Like the people who drink every day, smoke like a chimney and don’t eat vegetables, yet live to 102 years.
  • Re: racing high carbohydrate – that Maunder paper again – worth a read.

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Overcoming stumbling blocks on a ketogenic diet: a case study

I had a client contact me for an email consultation this week. She was frustrated as, despite following a ketogenic diet (where carbs are restricted to 30g or below, over 70% of calories should come from fat, and protein is moderated), she was unable to get into ketosis.

I had a look at her food diary and could quite quickly see where I thought she could change things to help enhance her ketogenic approach. With her blessing, she’s allowed me to share this with a wider audience. Like many things, if one person is having challenges finding the right balance in their diet, there are likely many more people doing very similar things and potentially experiencing the same frustrations.  I focused on some of the main issues I saw.

You’ll notice there are foods that don’t align with ketogenic diets OR would be included in any diet for someone wanting to shed fat. We (the client and I) spoke on that in general, as clearly she knows this (i.e. cheesecake). The points I focused on were those that can trip people up that she might not be aware of. I’ve screenshot her food diary, and then my comments are below.

Her diet:

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Major points – unable to get into ketosis despite sticking to under 30g carbohydrate per day. This is measured by a blood ketone meter, and she wondered if she needed to add more fat to do this. Her overall goal is weight loss.

The thing with weight loss and the ketogenic diet, if you follow the advice from Phinney and Volek, pioneers of the ketogenic diet space, part of the energy your body needs to consume should come from your own fat stores, and not be provided for by diet. It’s a common misconception, as I see many people embark on a ketogenic diet for fat loss purposes but the opposite occurs – they gain weight. A common strategy at this point is to further reduce carbohydrate intake and bump up the fat. However, this will often further exacerbate weight gain (and frustration around the approach). Worst case scenario here is when the frustration leads to ‘to hell with it’ and that low carb diet is supplemented with all manner of processed refined carb junk food because ‘what’s the point? I can’t do this anyway, I’m useless and it’s not working for me.’ Clearly the end result of this self-punishment is further fat gain, some horrible carb cravings and a bad psychological state. Needless to say, I don’t think adding in more fat is the answer in this instance (and for this client), however I do think that tweaking what she is already doing is going to help.

It’s also good to remember that blood ketones aren’t the be all and end all – these indicate ketones in your bloodstream but sometimes, when these are low, this just means we are using them for energy – which is what you want! This is more likely to be the case in an athlete rather than anyone who is generally just active. In this case example,  I think the diet is the main reason for her not being in ketosis, rather than that the client is using ketones efficiently. However,  it is worth remembering that if you are following a ketogenic diet and are not seeing the expected results on the blood ketone meter.

Finally (and something I mentioned to the client) you don’t need a ketogenic diet to successfully lose weight, and sometimes focusing instead on the pointers I give at the end, regardless of ketosis, will give the same end result. Something like my online menu planner and individualised nutrition coaching. However, I would recommend in that instance to up the protein (double the recommendation I give you) and drop back the fat intake, as people often find that far more satisfying and easier to adhere to – which ultimately is THE most important thing with any dietary approach.

Key issues I picked up:

  • Too much protein in one sitting/in general
  • Processed foods
  • Dairy
  • Unintentional free sugar

1.Milk –  both the sugar in a cup of milk and the protein (whey) will raise insulin levels, thus put you out of ketosis. This is true of skim and standard milk.

2. Protein cookies: the type of sweetener/fibre used to make it a lower carb item can also spike insulin. For some people it is definitely a dose response thing going on – they can eat ½ cookie no problem, but a whole one will kick them out of ketosis. For any items like these, and if you do have blood glucose or blood ketone meters, it can be good to get a reading after a certain dose to see what effect they have for you. At any rate, highly processed goods can still negatively impact on blood sugar and appetite regulation in the absence of them being carb-based.

3. Coconut water – contains 3g sugar per 100ml or thereabouts. Any amount of free sugar in the diet is going to impact pretty quickly on your blood sugar levels if you haven’t just finished exercising, and kick you out of ketosis. The types of carbs you want to be having in your diet are specifically non-starchy carbohydrates -the majority of any carb sources coming from green leafy vegetables, other colour vegetables, perhaps some pumpkin/carrot depending on their effects on your blood sugar.

4. Grapes: any fruit is going to impact on your blood sugar levels, and particularly grapes – even if you stick within your limit of carbohydrate, the sugar from these are going to hit your bloodstream pretty quickly and cause an insulin response, thereby lowering ketones, especially if eaten outside of a meal that contains fat and/or protein (both of which slow down the glucose from hitting the blood stream). Fruit is typically best avoided on a ketogenic diet, aside from lemons, grapefruit, some berries.

5. Protein content of meals: for most, these need to be lower unless an individual is athletic. If struggling with getting into ketosis, it can be good to lower protein consistently to 1g/kg ideal body weight. For this particular client, this is 65g per day. Many days are consistently above this. In addition, the amount of protein in any one meal makes a difference – ideally, not more than 30g protein in any one sitting and, for you, likely 20g in a meal. This is obviously going to differ from person to person – as mentioned, athletes who have a greater energy output can generally get away with more protein (and more carbohdyrate) compared to a person who is sedentary or just lightly active.

6. Timing of food: eating within a restricted window (and not eating later in the evening) can help a ketogenic diet – our liver’s ability to metabolise carbohydrate is dictated in part by a ciracadian rhythm;  we are naturally more carbohydrate sensitive in the AM, less so in the PM, so carbs are likely to spike insulin more in the evening. In addition, fasting naturally upregulates ketone production and can help accelerated ketosis. Further, snacking can (for some) keep them from being out of ketosis, so 3 meals, or 2 meals plus a snack is recommended.

Key recommendations:

1. Drop protein down in each of the meals so you are averaging approximately 20-25g at meals.

2. Time any foods that have a greater amount of carbohydrate in them for after exercise (ie lower sugar fruit, or nuts that have a higher carb count such as cashews). The body doesn’t need to rely on just the action of insulin to deliver carbohydrates to cells in this instance, as we have receptors called GLUT-4 receptors in our muscles and in adipose tissue that can take up carbohydate and are activated post-exercise. Remember, an increase in insulin suppresses the production of free fatty acids, the precursors to ketone bodies.

3. Engage in exercise to help upregulate ketone production – aerobic/weight training.

4. Fasting for 14h at a time to help body produce ketones. Now for women, fasting can be a great tool, but can also backfire (read more about that here). Generally speaking, the fasting approach can be something that is incorporated 1-2 x per week if fat loss is a goal, and on other days, opt for a 12h window between dinner one night and breakfast the next day. The most important thing, though, is to be aware of negative changes to energy, how you feel, mood and sleep patterns – all underlying signs of a stress response that you might not be able to cope with.

5. Focus on diet quality – so the carbs, protein, fats are coming from whole foods and not processed or snack foods – ie protein cookies, fat bombs etc

6. Remove drinks / foods that contain easily digested carbs even if they fall within the carb count for the day. You’ll feel far more satisfied (and it is far more nutritious) to get your carbohydrates from green leafy vegetables which also contains a good amount of fibre.

7. Dairy – stick to hard cheeses and forgo the softer cheese/milk.

These are just some pointers from this client’s diet; another practitioner may pick up others. I will reiterate my point, however, in that a ketogenic diet, when done purely for weight loss, isn’t always the best approach and, for alot of people, unsustainable and too much like hard work. If you’re struggling to get the balance right and not seeing the results, then there are definitely other alternatives out there – one which will fit your lifestyle, eating behaviour, budget and allow you to lose weight with far less effort. It’s adherence that is key. Let me help you with that.

Selection of healthy fat sources

Delicious, nutritious food regardless of your dietary approach.

My diet approach: less rigidity and more ‘real life’

A couple of comments on my Facebook page, a comment from a client that she wasn’t  ‘my perfect client’, and a post from one of my good nutritionist friends inspired me to have a bit of a think about how I approach nutrition, or the expectations that others have of my nutrition approach.

Whenever I put something out on social media, people will read from it what they will – I want them to comment and engage (why else would I put a post up?)  One of these was a comment I got after posting a recipe up on my page. Someone commented that she was very concerned that I say I follow a minimally processed diet approach, yet used a protein powder in my pancake recipe, clearly a highly processed ingredient*. She’s not wrong – protein powder is highly processed for sure, even the brands that I use and recommend others do: those that don’t have a lot of added ingredients bar the protein powder, some flavouring and stevia-based (or thaumine) sweetener . It got me thinking though. This person was annoyed that I was straying from their perception of what I advocate. If I could include protein powder in my recipes, clearly I’m not an advocate of the real food approach. How could people trust anything I say if I suggest that protein powder is okay? I wasn’t living up to her expectations of me, and she was disappointed.

It’s a tough balance: when I changed my philosophy around food I think I was a lot like other people – went too far in the extreme of finding the perfect real-food approach in an effort to ditch processed food. Legumes and all grains were off the menu (regardless of dietary tolerances, as this was the ‘perfect paleo’ way). All bread was to be avoided at all costs. Only drink red wine (less sugar) … It was 95% of what you’d call a ‘primal’ approach.

Like most people, though, I have settled in an approach to eating that is more practical to real life and, frankly, less exhausting. I have my diet non-negotiables –for me, I don’t touch diet soft drinks and chewing gum. In fact, I had a dream a few months ago that someone offered me a piece of gum and I took it. I woke up in a panicked state. This is because around 6 years ago I couldn’t go a day without having Wrigley’s Extra gum, and now I am scared that if I have it again that it would be a quick slide back into a daily habit that I couldn’t stop (even though when I gave it up it was literally like a switch had gone off in my brain and I couldn’t imagine having it again). I don’t have food allergies, so unlike other people, there isn’t anything that I must avoid or I’d be seriously compromising my health. That said, if I was eating the way I did during my Master’s degree at Otago, I couldn’t last during the day – I’d regularly have to nap in the afternoon under my desk after a diet coke and a massive ciabatta bun from Il Panificio bakery for lunch, which was backing up a large milky trim cappuccino and a dark rye sesame bun for breakfast. A carb overload and no fat or protein will do that to me (and a lot of people) – and don’t get me wrong – I LOVED it (and still would!) Just not how it makes me feel and, unfortunately, now I know too much about the long-term implications of eating such a nutrient-void diet). Huh. And I was doing a Master’s in nutrition at the time…

For everything else, though it is more about dietary principles rather than strict rigidity. Less religion and more realness. I try to avoid vegetable seed oils and artificial sweeteners that impact on blood sugar levels. However, if there is a dip that someone has brought along to a dinner party that has canola or sunflower oil as the second ingredient, I would likely have some if I thought it sounded nice, even if I wouldn’t buy it myself.  I avoid eating soy – especially products that use it as a cheap protein filler as you’ll find it in many packaged goods, though by now living in a vegetarian/vegan household, I eat organic tofu around once a week – and really enjoy it. I consume gluten when I have (for example) a date scone, or I really feel like toast. This might be once a fortnight. I drink wine. I have 3-4 alcohol free nights per week, but enjoy red wine (and coming into summer, white wine too – even though it has a higher residual sugar count). Not a lot – 1-2 glasses, and what they serve at the local bar is probably a more generous pour than we have at home. I like chocolate. I eat Quest protein bars (the varieties that don’t have sucralose as a sweetener in them – some do, some don’t) and use these as a bit of a stop gap as when training intensity ramps up (as it has over the last couple of months). I’m just hungrier in general and am not always organised. Despite their ‘organic’ label, these are about as far away from real food as you can get.

We buy white bread – the stock standard cheap loaves – as this is one of the only things that never comes home in the school lunch box during the week. If you’re wondering, I don’t think there is too much difference between white and multi-grain bread, really – it is all rubbish. I don’t eat it myself (any toast I have would be out at a cafe, a more delicious type of sourdough or ciabatta, probably), and can justify it till the cows come home but truth be told, getting any food in some kids can be difficult, so if they will eat a white bread egg or cheese sandwich that is going to at least fill them up, then so be it. A friend of mine commented on how she laughs when I post about lunchbox options for kids – and how (for her at least) it’s just a little unpractical and/or even if the kids show interest one day, the next they won’t have a bar of it. Now I get it. I really think I didn’t have a true appreciation for this and if I can somehow crack the nut that is ‘school lunches’ then I’d probably be a gazillionaire. One day. Maybe. (And if you have any bright ideas that I might not have thought of, pass them on!)

So, yeah. I still call my dietary principles ‘minimal processed food’ relative to the food environment and where I was at 7 years ago. Sorry to disappoint or concern anyone. Or perhaps this just makes you feel a little relieved that, despite best intentions, it doesn’t read like a perfect food environment or a perfect food diary, even for someone with my nutrition qualifications and practical experience. But that’s real life, and we do what we can. Some days are awesome, some weeks are awesome, and some, well, some just aren’t. That’s life, right? And when the dust settles, I’m pretty happy with it actually.  If you do what you can and have the best intentions going into it – then you’re always going to do better than if you didn’t try at all.

So please don’t think you have to be perfect – I’m not and nor should you stress about striving to be so. If you want some guidance at reaching your ‘happy spot’ click here to book a consultation or check out my online nutrition coaching services.