My diet approach: less rigidity and more ‘real life’

A couple of comments on my Facebook page, a comment from a client that she wasn’t  ‘my perfect client’, and a post from one of my good nutritionist friends inspired me to have a bit of a think about how I approach nutrition, or the expectations that others have of my nutrition approach.

Whenever I put something out on social media, people will read from it what they will – I want them to comment and engage (why else would I put a post up?)  One of these was a comment I got after posting a recipe up on my page. Someone commented that she was very concerned that I say I follow a minimally processed diet approach, yet used a protein powder in my pancake recipe, clearly a highly processed ingredient*. She’s not wrong – protein powder is highly processed for sure, even the brands that I use and recommend others do: those that don’t have a lot of added ingredients bar the protein powder, some flavouring and stevia-based (or thaumine) sweetener . It got me thinking though. This person was annoyed that I was straying from their perception of what I advocate. If I could include protein powder in my recipes, clearly I’m not an advocate of the real food approach. How could people trust anything I say if I suggest that protein powder is okay? I wasn’t living up to her expectations of me, and she was disappointed.

It’s a tough balance: when I changed my philosophy around food I think I was a lot like other people – went too far in the extreme of finding the perfect real-food approach in an effort to ditch processed food. Legumes and all grains were off the menu (regardless of dietary tolerances, as this was the ‘perfect paleo’ way). All bread was to be avoided at all costs. Only drink red wine (less sugar) … It was 95% of what you’d call a ‘primal’ approach.

Like most people, though, I have settled in an approach to eating that is more practical to real life and, frankly, less exhausting. I have my diet non-negotiables –for me, I don’t touch diet soft drinks and chewing gum. In fact, I had a dream a few months ago that someone offered me a piece of gum and I took it. I woke up in a panicked state. This is because around 6 years ago I couldn’t go a day without having Wrigley’s Extra gum, and now I am scared that if I have it again that it would be a quick slide back into a daily habit that I couldn’t stop (even though when I gave it up it was literally like a switch had gone off in my brain and I couldn’t imagine having it again). I don’t have food allergies, so unlike other people, there isn’t anything that I must avoid or I’d be seriously compromising my health. That said, if I was eating the way I did during my Master’s degree at Otago, I couldn’t last during the day – I’d regularly have to nap in the afternoon under my desk after a diet coke and a massive ciabatta bun from Il Panificio bakery for lunch, which was backing up a large milky trim cappuccino and a dark rye sesame bun for breakfast. A carb overload and no fat or protein will do that to me (and a lot of people) – and don’t get me wrong – I LOVED it (and still would!) Just not how it makes me feel and, unfortunately, now I know too much about the long-term implications of eating such a nutrient-void diet). Huh. And I was doing a Master’s in nutrition at the time…

For everything else, though it is more about dietary principles rather than strict rigidity. Less religion and more realness. I try to avoid vegetable seed oils and artificial sweeteners that impact on blood sugar levels. However, if there is a dip that someone has brought along to a dinner party that has canola or sunflower oil as the second ingredient, I would likely have some if I thought it sounded nice, even if I wouldn’t buy it myself.  I avoid eating soy – especially products that use it as a cheap protein filler as you’ll find it in many packaged goods, though by now living in a vegetarian/vegan household, I eat organic tofu around once a week – and really enjoy it. I consume gluten when I have (for example) a date scone, or I really feel like toast. This might be once a fortnight. I drink wine. I have 3-4 alcohol free nights per week, but enjoy red wine (and coming into summer, white wine too – even though it has a higher residual sugar count). Not a lot – 1-2 glasses, and what they serve at the local bar is probably a more generous pour than we have at home. I like chocolate. I eat Quest protein bars (the varieties that don’t have sucralose as a sweetener in them – some do, some don’t) and use these as a bit of a stop gap as when training intensity ramps up (as it has over the last couple of months). I’m just hungrier in general and am not always organised. Despite their ‘organic’ label, these are about as far away from real food as you can get.

We buy white bread – the stock standard cheap loaves – as this is one of the only things that never comes home in the school lunch box during the week. If you’re wondering, I don’t think there is too much difference between white and multi-grain bread, really – it is all rubbish. I don’t eat it myself (any toast I have would be out at a cafe, a more delicious type of sourdough or ciabatta, probably), and can justify it till the cows come home but truth be told, getting any food in some kids can be difficult, so if they will eat a white bread egg or cheese sandwich that is going to at least fill them up, then so be it. A friend of mine commented on how she laughs when I post about lunchbox options for kids – and how (for her at least) it’s just a little unpractical and/or even if the kids show interest one day, the next they won’t have a bar of it. Now I get it. I really think I didn’t have a true appreciation for this and if I can somehow crack the nut that is ‘school lunches’ then I’d probably be a gazillionaire. One day. Maybe. (And if you have any bright ideas that I might not have thought of, pass them on!)

So, yeah. I still call my dietary principles ‘minimal processed food’ relative to the food environment and where I was at 7 years ago. Sorry to disappoint or concern anyone. Or perhaps this just makes you feel a little relieved that, despite best intentions, it doesn’t read like a perfect food environment or a perfect food diary, even for someone with my nutrition qualifications and practical experience. But that’s real life, and we do what we can. Some days are awesome, some weeks are awesome, and some, well, some just aren’t. That’s life, right? And when the dust settles, I’m pretty happy with it actually.  If you do what you can and have the best intentions going into it – then you’re always going to do better than if you didn’t try at all.

So please don’t think you have to be perfect – I’m not and nor should you stress about striving to be so. If you want some guidance at reaching your ‘happy spot’ click here to book a consultation or check out my online nutrition coaching services.

Jan’s story: a real food success story

When I met Jan, she had already lost 10kg through Jenny Craig but was super unhappy and hungry, experiencing bouts of hypoglycaemia (and used dates to help lift her blood sugars again, which would exacerbate the problem), had knee pain, was experiencing patterns of low mood and overall didn’t feel very good. Further, her HbA1c, measure of long-term blood sugar control, placed her in the pre-diabetic range (above 41 mmol/L). To my mind, this cut-off seems a little arbitrary. There really is nothing different between 40 and 42 mmol/L where one is ‘fine’ and healthy, and the other is ‘pre-diabetic’. Many GPs I talk to feel the same, but I digress.

We talked through her diet, which was a little like this:

  • Pre-breakfast: Cup of tea plus piece of fruit (off to do some work on the farm)
  • Breakfast: 2 eggs on toast with butter
  • Snacks: scroggin mix, fruit, rice crackers
  • Lunch: salad with greens with grated cheese and tomatoes
  • Dinner: standard kiwi dinner food, with some adjustments made thanks to Jenny Craig programme.

It certainly wasn’t a junk-food diet the way we understand ‘junk food’ to be, however it was low in protein with the balance of macronutrients geared towards higher carbohydrate choices: fruit, toast, dried fruit, rice crackers etc.

We talked through dietary changes and lifestyle changes, and I made several recommendations based on the information she provided and subsequent blood tests that she had conducted. The main shifts in her diet were to:

  • Anchor meals around protein, fibre and fat to stabilise blood sugar
  • Avoid snacking where possible
  • Removal of most carbohydrate (including fruit) to help lower her overall blood sugar level
  • Including raw apple cider vinegar around meals (to help with glycemic control)
  • Remove dairy (clinically I see many women in their late 40s and above benefit from removing dairy from their diet)
  • Supplementing with magnesium and chromium for blood sugar control, and supplements to help support her liver function
  • Slow cook meat wherever possible (to reduce the formation of advanced glycated end-products which are toxic, especially for someone with poor blood sugar control).

Over the course of the next 14 weeks, Jan has experienced the following:

  • Sleep has improved
  • Knees no longer sore when moving
  • Blood sugars have stabilised, no signs of hypoglycaemia
  • Mood has infinitely improved
  • Skin and hair are better
  • No cravings
  • Appetite is good, feels satisfied with food
  • Body composition changes: she has dropped 15 kg
  • HbA1c had dropped to 37 mmol/L (out of the ‘danger’ zone).

Importantly, her overall wellbeing is SO much better than it was. She sounds so much brighter on the phone, she feels so much better about herself and she has achieved so much. When we caught up two months ago at our previous appointment her weight had stabilised around 5 kg heavier than it is now, though she continued to notice body composition changes – her shape was changing but on the scales, it was the same. I see that frequently, and nothing is linear, of course. It can be weeks of plateauing on the scales before they shift. Is this a metabolic adaptation? Not sure. Usually it’s compliance to diet, though Jan had been consistent with her approach. Of course, there are things you can do to help move the needle a little bit if necessary, but sometimes it can just be a matter of waiting it out before the trend down continues. The key is to not be demotivated by this. Scales can be a good indicator of progress, but remember not to rely on them as the sole indicator. Luckily for Jan, she was experiencing the benefits of eating well every day, so even though the number on the scale hadn’t changed, she still felt good about her lifestyle change. Her husband has also benefited from her lifestyle change, dropping excess body fat by virtue of eating from the same food supply.

A typical day’s food intake for Jan now would be:

  • Breakfast: 2 eggs plus bacon and mushrooms
  • Lunch: salad, chicken, a boiled egg
  • Dinner: salmon, roast pumpkin and carrot and salad

OR

  • Breakfast: 3 scrambled eggs, tomatoes, spinach
  • Lunch: sushi (no rice), cabbage slaw
  • Dinner: butter chicken with cauliflower rice

If she feels like a sweet treat, she makes something like this Pete Evans nut bar, or mixes up some coconut yoghurt and frozen berries to make a sorbet-type dessert, and is completely satisfied. She was initially worried about my reaction to the nut bar, given it’s got some dried fruit in it, however she reiterated that she cut it into 30 pieces, froze it, and brings it out “not every day” to have with a coffee. Honestly, though, had she told me she ate it every day and got these physical and psychological benefits, then it is working for her regardless of what I think (in the context of an already stellar food intake). One food doesn’t make or break a diet.

She finds it is super easy for her to follow this way of eating and eating out or with other people is not an issue. She asks for dressings for salads, and sauces for steaks on the side to control how much of these she has, and to help avoid hidden added sugar or industrial seed oils that are commonly found in these foods. She is ‘busy’ but not overly active, and we are working on getting her resistance training up to help protect her bones AND increase muscle mass. These two things will help her overall health and prevent sarcopenia in later years. We are starting with home based activities for this. While she could have started this earlier, it’s sometimes easier to focus on one health behaviour and bring the others in – everyone is different though; so this needs to be considered on a case-by-case basis.

One thing she does find interesting is other people’s reaction to her weight loss, with some people asking when she will stop doing what she’s doing (as if it is a ‘diet’, which Jan isn’t on), or saying that she is getting ‘too thin.’ This regularly happens when someone loses weight and gains health; people are used to seeing a different version of them. To deviate from this can be unsettling. For others, they subconsciously take the actions of someone like Jan personally, like she (who is adopting the improved health behaviour) is doing it to highlight some failing of their own. While that might seem ego-centric of them, I don’t think it’s on purpose for most people! These people are often good friends and want to see you succeed. The important thing for Jan in this instance is to not take on board what others say and stay confident and strong in her approach.

So that’s Jan. Awesome, huh? She’s booked a holiday too – something she said she wouldn’t have contemplated previously. This has less to do with her weight (though certainly she can move around much more freely) but more about the increase in overall wellbeing that has occurred through adopting these changes. It makes me feel so privileged to work with people like Jan and share in their success. While I gave Jan the tools to guide her, the hard work was up to her. If you’re in a position to do the same, click here to set up an appointment, or check out my online nutrition coaching options here.

paleo-table

Delicious food! (PC: runningcompetitor.com)