So… have you gone all keto?

Yes. But unlike my decision to ‘go paleo’ this was a predetermined, calculated, conscious decision and not ‘by default’, which is how my whole food philosophy came about. And that’s largely because it would be very difficult to just ‘go keto’ without some predetermined, calculated, conscious decision making occurring. Although, with the wisdom that is obviously gained from now 9 days of carbohydrate and protein restriction, and the consumption of vastly increased grams of fat I am pretty sure a lot of people out there who believe they are ketogenic might not be – if the websites devoted to keto foods and recipes are anything to go by. How on earth would they be in ketosis with protein portions that large??

Now why would I bother jumping on the keto bandwagon? A few reasons. A lot of people I know have tried it and I’ve reached a point where I’m curious enough to see if I had the discipline to follow such a strict dietary regime (regime is a rather harsh word, but I feel it’s applicable for this diet). Whilst some people observe what I eat and exclaim how ‘disciplined’ I am (like it’s a virtue), I love what I eat and eat what I want – eating a real food diet isn’t about discipline, it’s about pleasure. The strict limits on not only carbohydrate but protein requires discipline largely reserved for the very analytical and uber intelligent (i.e. Peter Attia over at Eating Academy).

The second reason is self experimentation – a far cry from the days I mocked people for using the term n=1, I now wanted to experience, document and reflect on how it feels to undertake a ketogenic diet. A great way to learn and understand anything is to experience it. My weight and body image issues growing up, for example, have provided me with better insight into the challenges faced by clients who battle with similar problems, despite the fact that, physically, we may look very different. As a number of my clients now have heard of a ketogenic diet and just want to try it, or have legitimate health reasons that warrant a ketogenic approach as a tool to improve metabolic health markers, then to be able to speak from experience is obviously advantageous.

The final reason is because Caryn gave it a go. And therefore, out of those left in our research team at Human Potential Centre who had yet to follow a ketogenic diet, I was the only person left who had yet to try it. Other than Scott. And as he is still drinking energy drinks (albeit he’s switched to the sugar free variety, and swigs water after having it to protect his teeth), it’s fair to say our respective diets are poles apart at this point. However he has recently jumped on the Twitter bandwagon so I’m sure it won’t be too long before he’s swigging bottles of MCT oil and professing the benefits of butter like it’s nobody’s business. However, I am a nutritionist and, as the last one standing I felt not a small amount of FOMO by having not at least tried it. I’m actually in the best position out of my colleagues – as I can learn from their mistakes. Like I did at St Johns. As a cadet in my younger years we had regional competitions that required assessing a medical emergency and stitching or bandaging people up with the one who illustrated the most knowledge walking away with the trophy. As my last name is Williden I was usually last to front up, and my St John’s group would filter information to me so, by the time it was my turn, I was armed with all necessary information to go into the medical situation and assess, inform, and bandage with skills that would make me an indispensable member of McDreamy’s team. This ketogenic diet experiment is not dissimilar, minus the trophy and the badge to stitch on my jersey.

So Day 9… A short time, sure. But I’ve learned a few things already.

  1. It’s hard to stick to the protein limit. Really hard. I got an inkling of that when I read Tim Noakes’ Real Meal Revolution recommendation of keeping animal protein to 80g per meal absolute amounts. But who also knew vegetables contained so much protein?
  2. That it is hard to get the amount of fat necessary for ketosis and overeat. My food volume has dramatically reduced. Obviously, though, if you do eat more fat than you need, this will be reflected in weight gain/gastrointestinal problems etc over the long term.
  3. That I’d wildly underestimated the amount of peanut/almond/coconut butter I actually ate in normal life (like somehow the Gilmours 3kg bags of nuts just disappeared of their own accord). I’ve never tracked my food to this extent (using Easy Diet Diary app for iPhone) and it is a real eye opener.
  4. That not all food apps are created equal. For example, Fitday lists broccoli has having almost as much carbohydrate as pumpkin. It doesn’t.
  5. That for some people to get into ketosis, 50g of carbohydrate (CHO) might be too high, and closer to 30g is better. Is this a female thing? Maybe. This is clearly insight from Caryn who passed this on. While the academic literature often places limits of 20-30g CHO/day,  there are also studies that refer to a low carbohydrate, high protein diet as ‘ketogenic.’ Confusion is clearly not limited to the bloggersphere.
  6. There is a lot of misinformation on the Internet about ketogenic diets. But there are some very smart people writing about this – way smarter and knowledgeable than I am.
  7. People are unnecessarily verbose in recipes and post too many ‘stages’ pictures.
  8. That, despite being my dislike of Thai food and Thai restaurants, I really like my own Thai red curry coconut chicken. (I must be the only person who doesn’t like Thai food. I know. Is it the cheesy American cover songs and proliferation of sweet chilli sauce? Maybe).
  9. That making pastry is way easier than I ever realized.
  10. That if you decide to make pastry to turn that chicken curry into a pie, you should probably check that you own a rolling pin (or a good substitute) first
  11. That I make really good rhubarb crumble and chicken curry pie. These and other recipes are over on my Facebook nutrition page – definitely check them out.

Other thoughts:

  1. Training wise – I’ve felt great. Up until Friday and then it felt like I’d been turned upside down and emptied out. Hardest. Run. Ever. Barely breaking 5.30 k’s (actually that’s an estimate – thankfully Nicky’s evil Garmin wasn’t working and I was too scared to wear mine). Friday and Saturday were complete write offs but today’s run – storming. Seriously. Even after doing weights yesterday I woke up feeling better than I have in a long time.
  2. During normal day: I’ve felt flat. A bit sick on some days too – and particularly on the days when I missed having a coffee with cream, or something similar, which reduces amount of fat I start the day with. But, again, today I feel back to being awesome.
  3. Twice during the week I woke up and couldn’t get back to sleep for an hour. Unusual for me, though not unheard of. Last night I slept right through. This may be due to the diet, might have nothing to do with it.
  4. I miss fruit. And dates. And wine (for now – I’m abstaining for now, given that alcohol is preferentially metabolized in the body – which would largely offset my efforts to turn fat into the go-to fuel tank).
  5. While I, like many people, have my go-to foods, nine days into this and I’ve needed a bit of variety to keep me focused. I typically eat a TON of vegetables, and would feel largely dissatisfied to sit down to a third of that with extra dressing added as a fat source.
  6. It’s a shame that I’m making all these awesome meals and I have yet to meet my future husband. He is seriously missing out on some good eats.

I know. I’m late to the party on this. Just like the paleo/real food/whole food movement, I’m pontificating on something that some of you reading this would have read about, adopted, wrote about, reflected on and then moved on five years ago. If this is you, and you have some wise words then please share! This is a learning curve for me (and clients) so the more I know the better.

So I’m hoping for that ‘keto’ clarity, that ethereal experience people talk about, and that today’s run was indicative of the amazing training that I will experience as I undergo this keto experiment. (It goes without saying that this will of course turn me into an amazing athlete lol) I’m also hoping that my experience will add to the information out there that seems, for the most part, from the male experience. There are a few women writing about it, but it is largely a male dominated space. I will keep you updated, both here and on my Facebook page. Right. Off to make keto hot cross buns. Because nothing says Easter like almond flour buns dressed with a white cross.

 

3 thoughts on “So… have you gone all keto?

  1. Really appreciate this blog post Mikki as I am on day 7 of my own ketogenic diet challenge so I loved reading about your experiences so far. I’m a nutritionist and I’ve been following a low carb diet for several years now. I was inspired to take the extra step and try this challenge after attending the low carb in NZ conference. In the past 3 weeks I’ve reduced my carbs to 30-40grams but I wasn’t getting into ketosis so I’m down to 20g this week and that has helped. I’ve ordered a blood ketone meter so I can find out exactly what my ketone levels are. Are you using a blood monitor or ketostix? I too am really interested to see how this all works from a female perspective. I’m 39 and am trying to lose the last 4kgs of pregnancy weight (my ‘baby’ is 3 now!). I’ve plateaued for a long time so I’m hoping that this change of diet will help shake up my (crappy!) metabolism and help me reach my goal. I also want to walk the talk so I can help clients through the ketosis process with more knowledge of how it can work for women.
    I must tell you what I have been eating recently…..fat bombs! It’s a great way to get extra fat in with hardly any protein or carbs. I melt coconut oil/butter/almond butter/coconut and raw cacao and put it into little chocolate moulds in the freezer. They are really delicious and fill the gap if I’m feeling flat.
    Anyway, Good luck for your challenge and please keep us posted on your observations/results. 🙂

    • Hi Sheryl, thanks for your note, and it’s interesting also to hear your experience. You’ve mentioned that you’ve limited your CHO – Protein is another one to look at. Too low in CHO will not leave much room in the way of dark leafy greens which (IMO) are important for vitamins and phytochemicals (and I love vegetables!) From my reading, and anecdotally, protein could be what is keeping you out of ketosis, or perhaps you need to lift your overall fat grams in order to shift the proportion of energy coming from fat? I’m using a blood ketone meter and so far my levels have been between 0.5/0/9 at night and 1.4/2.3 during day and 0.8 on rising. Also, I’m not sure if you’re training at all, but shifting to higher intensity intermittent training (HIIT) along with resistance training – short/sharp/heavy – is extremely beneficial to help shift fat 🙂 And yes, people love those fat bombs! Good luck!

  2. Thanks for your advice Mikki – once I get my monitor I will have a clearer idea on how things are working. I am 66kgs and am keeping my protein at approx. 70g but might need to drop lower if ketosis isn’t happening. As you say, I can’t really drop the CHO much lower or there won’t be enough room for veges! I am trying to adjust my workouts too with more sprinting and targeted weights sessions. Hopefully this will get the scale moving 🙂 I’ve lost 500g fat this week which is a great start. I’m planning on doing this exclusively for 8 weeks to see what the result is and then will hopefully be able to add a few more carbs in there to maintain. That is the plan anyway 🙂 xxx

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